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Glebe House Annual Report 2016
annual report 16

Glebe House 40th Annual Report 2015
annual report 2015

Glebe House Annual Report 2014
Annual Report 2014

report a

Chairperson’s Report

Harmony Community Trust activities for 2013 were concentrated on developing links between communities and individuals in North Down, Ards and Down Districts. This was in line with our strategy adopted in 2010, to concentrate on promoting positive community relations and realise our aims and objectives in the communities closest to Glebe House. This targeting has proved to be worthwhile by including participants in need of the opportunities that Glebe House can offer and addressing sectarianism and hidden interfaces. We hope that our programme has helped in improving levels of trust within and between communities, and decreasing levels of prejudice in the area. The EU Peace III phase 2 funding has been vital for our work, but we have also been indebted to other funders enabling us to consolidate and extend the programme for long-term sustainability. We have not worked exclusively within the Peace III cluster, but have welcomed groups from Belfast, Dublin and elsewhere. We have provided 3681 person days to 736 disadvantaged children, and young people, 291 volunteers and 706 adults. There were 74 different groups as well as individuals making use of our facilities with volunteers from 13 different countries. The Council of Management worked hard during the year to ensure continuation of our work following the anticipated demise of Peace III funding in December 2013 with the subsequent reduction in the staffing complement and the need to source programme and core funding from a variety of funders. The twelfth hour announcement of a Peace III extension until September 2014 has given us breathing space to adjust and we are confident that our strategic planning sets us in good stead for much needed work in the future. The demand for our services continues to grow and Glebe House has proved once more, its value as a shared and safe venue for cross-community activities for all ages. Our challenge continues to be finding the funding necessary to sustain and extend this work in the future, continuing the ongoing task of overcoming sectarianism, racism and other prejudices, in order to create a shared and inclusive society. We are up for the challenge but need the financial support.
Helen Honeyman Chairperson Harmony Community Trust Council of Management.

Children & Youth Programme

Disadvantaged children and young people from different backgrounds, have worked together throughout the year on an evolving series of activities which focused on developing their awareness of similar and different identities, beliefs and attitudes thus leading to the promotion of good relations and a sense of shared future. It has been encouraging to see the young people develop new friendships, self-esteem and confidence whilst enjoying new, fun and positive experiences. Glebe House has provided a safe, non-judgemental environment allowing children to enjoy time away from difficulties they may be experiencing at home. One of the older girls commented that this was her first ever residential as there were no opportunities in her area and her family couldn't afford to pay for schools trips. All young people are given the chance to express their feelings about their Glebe House experience and it is heartening to read some of their comments, which sum up the value of the programme!. “It was the best time I have ever had in my life” “I can’t wait to come back to see my friends and the donkeys” One girl said she had no garden to play in and no-one took her to the park or for walks. That is what she loved about Glebe, as well as the way the "older people" talked to her, made her laugh and let her play. Many children come from rurally isolated areas and are lonely ,with few other children to play with. Glebe House gives them the chance to make new friends and have new experiences. 28 community groups took part in activities along with individually referred children. Sustained contact over the year allowed leaders and children to build relationships with several groups meeting outside of Glebe House. Some are actively seeking funding to maintain their contact into 2014. As we move to a shared future, there is still a need for the work HCT does, as unfortunately, sectarianism and deprivation continue to exist in all areas.
Sharon Heane Chairperson Children and Youth programme Committee

Teenage Work Study Programmes

These have given disadvantaged young people aged 14 to 17, from different communities, a chance to meet new people, make new friends, have new experiences and get a taste of what it is like to be a volunteer. The programme consisted of a mixture of practical projects at Glebe House, such as tidying up the grounds and planting trees, as well as, teambuilding challenges, talks about different forms of volunteering, visits and social activities. The groups and individuals linked well together and met up after their programme had finished to stay in contact socially. Some of the older teenagers have become volunteers in their own community and at Glebe House. Some even tried to take over Belfast City Hall by having their photographs taken in the council chamber. Altogether 49 young people benefited from the programme during the year. It was part funded by the Community Foundation for Northern Ireland, whose support was much appreciated. We are hoping to expand this programme in 2014 and beyond, particularly linking the voluntary work to developing our environmental projects and creating an educational resource.

Adult Programme
The challenge of the Adult programme has been to ensure our activities were underpinned by promoting understanding and addressing difference across community and cultural divides for people from rural areas. The activities were a tool for providing opportunities for people from a wide variety of backgrounds to meet and explore their shared and differing social, cultural, and religious backgrounds. As the participants developed deeper relationships and mutual trust, it was exciting to see the development of dialogue and discussion that challenged misconceptions as well as an eagerness for more challenging activities and study trips. Whilst all activities have been fun, some, judging from feedback and comments, have been very moving and emotional. It has also been a meaningful experience for many participants and volunteers. The challenge is to consolidate and build on the learning experience that this programme has provided and involve more groups. The adult programme set out to develop cross community linkages across the hidden interfaces in East Down. Diverse workshops, with a community relations focus, developed links between people to begin trust building. The study tours evoked memories and debunked a few historical myths, whilst the day events provided people with space to discuss and exchange views. Workshops creating a Peace Quilt generated discussions about the racist and sectarian attitudes which exist in the rural areas of Co. Down, generating comments such as; ”Isn’t it grand that we’re all different but the whole quilt looks great” and “It’s a pity the politicians can’t do the same for the country” HCT has provided opportunities for people to explore various attitudes to peace and reconciliation, developing an open mindedness to past and present current affairs. It is now incumbent on us to further enable neighbouring, but different, communities to work together. We hope the ripple effect of this programme may trickle down and give hope and inspiration to those engaging in creating a shared society.
Dee Kelly, Chairperson Adult Programme Committee

Volunteering, culture, craic and cornflakes

This year Glebe House would like to recognise the incalculable contribution of the volunteers who are Harmony Community Trust. Our volunteers are a very special group of individuals. They come from all walks of Northern Ireland and world society, from Ballynahinch to Brisbane, representing all shades of political opinion, religious persuasion and none, young and not so young, with all of life’s experiences behind them. They make up what is Harmony Community Trust, being the linchpin for the aims and spirit of the organisation. This past year has been no exception. We have welcomed volunteers from near and far, to work on our programmes, and keep their heads when all about them are trying to fly flags. We have a policy of recruiting local volunteers from the same communities as the children. They know the children and local environment, which can help with issues such as home sickness. Volunteers are involved in every aspect of the children’s residential programme. They perform all the childcare duties; run the activities and bring a fulfilled and enthusiastic sense of doing something positive for the right reasons. They can be working from early morning until late in the evening for up to 6 days on the trot, but still leave with smiles on their faces. They may be tired but it is well earned and after some rest and relaxation are back, ready to join the next residential. Each year we host a number of overseas volunteers through Service Civil International. The volunteers come from all over Europe but due to UK visa restrictions, we have had problems with hosting non-EU volunteers. We have relied on SCI-UK in Scotland to assist with this. Our successful, if complicated, application to the UK Border Agency means we can now accept a limited number of non-EU volunteers. We are now looking at hosting some long term volunteers, to be a part of the HCT community, through organisations such as Service Civil International, Brethren Service, USA and Eirene, Germany. It is over 12 years since we had LTV’s at Glebe House so this is an exciting development. During the summer, we hosted 3 international volunteers, Klara from the Czech Republic, Donata from Italy and Alison from New Jersey bringing a bit of internationalism to our children’s programme. A big thank you to all our summer volunteers including community leaders and local people from everyone involved at Glebe House Our annual International Workcamp ran for 2 weeks in early September in association with the Irish branch of SCI. This year the 14 volunteers came from Austria, Spain, Germany Italy, Hungary, Ireland, France, England and Northern Ireland.. They were involved in a range of activities from the end of summer clean up to environmental and construction work on our nature / play area. There were a number of discussions relating to Northern Ireland and the peace process and they went on a very wet trip to the UK City of Culture 2013, taking in the historical sights and rain of the Maiden City. Thanks are due for their hard work which is basic but invaluable for the maintenance and development of Glebe House Glebe House has become more than a residential centre. We run a great number of day activities particularly during the midweek periods. There are themed and seasonal Day Programmes for adults including seniors, Workshops on a wide range of issues and skills and Study Trips to places of social and cultural interest. Some activities are starting to become annual events. For the last few years we have run a very successful Mid -Summers evening and our Burns Night in January is taking on a life of its own. Glebe House becomes Scottish for a day with kilts, haggis, bagpipes, country-dances and readings and songs from Robbie Burns. It’s a great night of Scottish culture and Northern Ireland craic. Open Day, in June, our community fun day, is now a set event in the local calendar, with over 600 people attending. Our children’s Summer Scheme and Saturday arts clubs are also becoming an established part of our programme. They offer local children the opportunity to experience a very creative arts programme run by Judith O’Neill. A small group of volunteers who tend to get forgotten, but without whom we would not exist, are our committee members. They sit in meetings discussing legal issues, dealing with current government legislation, getting their heads around budget figures and dealing with the hidden side of what keeps a charity on track and delivering its aims. They are the unsung volunteers with their hands firmly on the tiller of Harmony Community Trust. I would like to thank the Glebe House staff team for their commitment and dedication to their work in delivering our very successful programmes over the last year. A special mention of thanks and appreciation must go to Angela Fitzpatrick and Debbie Sharvin who finished their contracts with us in December. We also thank Joanna Misiak (Asha) who finished in September. Glebe House is a unique and special place for people of all ages. We are continually trying to make sure our resources, facilities and activities are up to the highest standards. We rely on the support of the local community in the Strangford and Kilclief area and are indebted to our volunteers who give up their time to participate in our many programmes and activities. We look forward to continuing the work of peace building and providing new and unique experiences for all our visitors at Glebe House.
Diarmaid McGarrigle Centre Manager


Summary Statement of Financial Activities Year ended 31 March 2013

Incoming resources 2012
£
2013
£
Generated funds    
Voluntary income 179,893 79,393
Activities for generating funds 6.301 5,030
Charitable activities    
Core grants 32,343 32,343
Programme activities 119,162 146,032
Total incoming resources 337,599 262,698
 
Resources expended    
Cost of generating voluntary income 5,881 6,855
Charitable activities 280,092 271,711
Governance costs 7,715 1,490
 
Total resources expended 293,688 280,256
 
Net incoming resources for year (43,911) (17,358)
Funds brought forward 432,824 476,735
Total funds carried forward 476,735 459,377
* includes restricted funds income £33,899, £32,243 and £76,518 and costs £164,476    
 
Balance Sheet 2012 2013
31 March 2012 £ £
Fixed assets 468,020 468,728
Current assets    
Debtors 86,864 15,270
Cash at bank and in hand 163 176
  89,027 15,446
Creditors falling due within one year (78,312) (24,797)
Net current liabilities (8,715) (9,351)
Net assets 476,735 459,377
 
Reserves    
Unrestricted funds- general funds (32,411) (33,351)
Restricted funds - building and capital grant 444,324 424,026
  476,735 459,377
 


The summary figures for 2012 and 2011 have been extracted from the full audited accounts.

Honorary Treasurer’s Report

The financial results for the year reflect a full year of programmes for children and adults funded under the European Peace III initiative. As ever, Council remain aware of the continuing increased challenges to come from restricted sources of funding, and in particular the limited extended period of Peace III funding, and are devoting their efforts to restructuring and further extending the sources of income for future years. It should be noted that the current market value of the land and buildings is considered to be £0.7 million, which is still considerably in excess of the carrying value in the balance sheet of £411,526.
David Boyd

Fundraising and Sponsorship
We have been funded and supported during the year by the North Down, Ards and Down Peace III Partnership, the DHSS&PS Child Care Policy Directorate, BBC Children in Need, Lloyds TSB Foundation for Northern Ireland, The Community Foundation for Northern Ireland, The Big Lottery, Awards for All and Down and Ards District Councils. We thank them for enabling us to develop our cross-community work with disadvantaged young people and adults from local community groups. Because of the lack of statutory funding for community relations programmes with children and young people, the Peace III funding was much appreciated partly though its administrative burden and funding conditions curtailed our capacity to fundraise elsewhere both for groups from outside the cluster area and for continuation funding. This became increasingly urgent as the end date of December 31st loomed closer and closer. The twelfth hour extension for Peace III, is helping us to secure alternative funding to support our Good Relations and peace
building programmes. We are also trying to re-educate community groups about the need for contributions towards the cost of our activities. As usual we must thank the many individuals and local businesses who helped with donations and support for our various fundraising events. We are grateful for the various gifts and donations received from friends of HCT and Glebe House. Open Day was a great success which we hope will be repeated in 2014. Jams, Apples, sweeties and other items for sale continue to contribute a small income, but we need to increase fundraising at all levels. We are on the look out for supporters prepared to run fundraising events on our behalf as such non-earmarked income is vital for our sustainability. Gifts in kind and voluntary work help maintain the facilities and programme at a minimal cost. During the year, we benefited from the labours of DHSS&PS staff, and Voluntary Service International in addition to our teenage groups, and a committed band of regular volunteers and committee members.
Thank you




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Chairperson’s Report:
The past year has been significant in marking a turning point in our finances. Thanks to a generous donation from Children’s Project NI who sadly closed their doors in 2012 we eliminated our historic overdraft, replaced our second minibus, the antiquated, Rookery boiler and purchased swings for the new play area. Our programmes during the year have been dominated by our commitment to the North Down, Ards and Down Peace III programme developing cross-community linkages with young people, and adults from community groups in disadvantaged areas of the three council districts. These have proved to be very successful and the demand for continuing the programmes is increasing as we move into the final phase in 2013. Unfortunately, apart from EU Peace III funding, there continues to be a complete absence of statutory funding for Community Relations work with young people, despite the obvious, if unfortunate, need for long term work in this area. Small grants from the YCNI, Lottery and Community Foundation NI have enabled us to continue to develop the successful teenage programme with a focus on volunteering. We have also been grateful to the Lloyds TSB Foundation for NI for a grant towards developing our environmental play area with willow sculptures and other novel features. It has been much enjoyed by visiting groups throughout the year. Outside groups continuing to make use of our facilities have included Voluntary Service International and the Neighbourhood Youth Projects from Dublin, the former maintaining our historic links with Service Civil International and the latter continuing a long and fruitful partnership. The changing composition of the NYP groups makes us conscious of the move towards a multi-cultural society in Ireland and the need to widen our views on promoting positive community relations. Overall, we have provided 5,353 person days to 1,695 disadvantaged children, and young people, 328 volunteers and 981 adults. There were 70 different groups as well as individuals making use of our facilities and volunteers from 12 different countries. I should like to thank the staff, volunteers who continue to make Glebe House the positive experience it is for so many participants in our programmes, young and old. I must also thank my fellow committee members for their hard work and dedication to the cause over the past year and last but not least our funders, statutory, corporate and individual, who ensure the continuation of the work of Harmony Community Trust.
Helen Honeyman

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Centre Managers Report 2012

2012 will be remembered as the year of the big rains, it just never stopped all year, with every season seeming to get progressively wetter than the one before. Dry days were the exception so raincoats and wellies were in constant use. A bit of rain never stops us at Glebe House, so we ploughed on even if the furrows were a bit muddy and our programmes have continued to thrive and grow. The sad news of this year was the death of Sergeant out oldest donkey. After a very long and happy life at Glebe House he died of a stroke and old age back in January. The remaining 4 members of our donkey team, Theao, Doagh, Jack & Thomas continue to give enjoyment to children and adults no mater what the weather throws at us.
During the year we have seen an enhanced development in our Peace III programme, with children and adults from the 3 council areas, on new and exciting residential and day activities, taking part in our community relations programmes. All of the staff at Glebe House must be thanked for their commitment to the Peace III programme. From the recruitment and face to face working with the group participants, to the nightmarish task of providing the administration and paperwork that seems at times more important than the delivery of the programme itself, a very grateful thanks to Angela, Andrew, Bernie, Debbie, Julie, Karin and Marie, keep at just one more year to go.

New Play area.



At the end of January we started on a new environmental project that has been in the planning for some years. The new play area at Glebe House will provide a safe environment for children and adults to relax and play in an area rich in wild life and nature, planted out with willow structures, native trees and shrubberies. The work began with the help of teenage groups funded by Lloyds TSB Foundation for Northern Ireland and YCNI, in preparing and clearing the land, local volunteers and children then assisted in the major job of planting the trees and establishing the new willow structures. Thank you to Gerard McCloskey for his help with the Willow structures and his photography and video skills. The work progressed during the cold but thankfully dry days in February and March, with over 800 trees being planted throughout the site. Thanks must go to Lloyds banking group and the Woodland Trust for funding the trees destined for the play area. With the help of Mother Nature the trees have thrived over the last year and the area is looking great. This is a project that will be ongoing with continual tree planting and other play structure developments.

Visiting Groups
As usual we were very pleased to welcome back groups including Service Civil International, on the YUWG seminar in March and then our workcamp group in September, a big thanks to all the workcampers who made the 2012 camp a very memorable one. The Neighbourhood Youth Project from Dublin ran a week long programme in July and then camp back with the Irish / German exchange programme in October. On 3 days in March we welcomed groups from Chest Heart & Stroke on a relaxing visit using the Harry building. In September we were joined by Henderson’s Food Team who popped in to repaint the Activity Barn walls. Thank you to all the Henderson’s staff for making this project happen. Our very good friends from Stormont came for a visit in October, cutting hedges and clearing the front lawn. Our thanks go to the staff of DHSS&PS at castle building.
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The Grassroots staff team
Joanna Misiak better known a Aisa joined our staff team in July, assisting in the kitchen, she along with Patrick our Cook and with the voluntary assistance of Emiko & Ivor make up the unseen little group that help Glebe House run that little bit more smoothly, hygienically and safely.

Conclusion
2012, besides the rain, has been a good year at Glebe House, with exciting and innovatory community relations programmes, and a wealth of new visitors from across Northern Ireland and beyond. Once again we were supported by local people, shops and businesses that have helped in so many ways over the year. I would like to thank Thomas Duffy and sons Strangford & Killough, for their continued support. All of the residents of Kilclief and Strangford for their support and tolerance To our volunteers from across the world who have kept Glebe House going, Thank you one and all.
Diarmaid Mc Garrigle Centre Manager

Adult Programme:
This has continued to develop over the year thanks to the continued funding from Peace III. Groups from North Down. Ards and Down already involved in previous programmes continued to participate and groups from Drumaness, Ballykinlar, Loughinisland, Glen Estate Newtownards, Holywood, Ballywalter and Portaferry joined in. These newcomers were given opportunities to meet those familiar with the Peace Programme and to share their experiences.
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Study Tours:
A total of 9 cross-community study tours were organised during the year with 185 participants a study visit to the Somme Centre was followed up by a day focusing on the World Wars, the Ulster Covenant and the Easter Rising. For the Spelga Tour, Castlewellan, gave a short history of their centre and guided us through their locality. In Killyleagh the leaders introduced us to an accomplished guide who stimulated discussion on the sites we visited. A popular tour was that to Ballywalter House to learn about life in the” Big House” and another view of life was given on the Shankill and Falls, a tour led by ex-paramilitary prisoners. The summer mystery tour visited South Armagh and the Ring of Gullion.
Day Events:
Themed days throughout the year, were enjoyed by all. They provided opportunities for people to share experiences and memories of growing up and living in different communities, reflect on working lives and talk about a future shared society. The days varied from a Cultural evening of music and dance reflecting our diverse cultural heritage including that of the Indian community, to Easter and Spring celebrations, The Titanic, “Midsummer Madness”, Halloween, Harvest and Christmas. The organised music, dance and crafts provided opportunities for people to talk and share common experiences.
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Workshops:
Workshops provide opportunities for participants to work with each other in small groups and learn new skills. As people share these practical experiences they form bonds leading to personal conversations. Workshops on felting, scrapbooking and woodcrafts were on offer as well as Family History, the basic use of computers, the internet and digital imaging. A small group took part in ‘walk and talk’ sessions with guided visits to local historical sites. Not only do these programmes provide openings for the practice of new skills but they also allow people to get to know and appreciate their own locality and that of others. By building confidence and understanding, many of the workshops have led to occasions when people have felt at ease to discuss sensitive sectarian issues. We are grateful for our volunteers, including drivers, Eamonn and Ivor. who enhance our programme in so many ways. We also appreciate the cooperation from Down Museum and the Down Rural Community Network. Above all we would like to thank the participants who make the work worthwhile.
Angela Fitzpatrick, Adult Programme Team Leader

Children & Youth Programme
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The Peace III funding allowed us to develop existing relationships with 9 groups and create new ones with Comber; Bangor YMCA Polish group; Hillcrest, Ballynahinch; Glen Estate and Bowtown, Newtownards and Castlewellan Youth Club. Groups came together, on a cross-community basis, for an initial weekend, followed by a 6 day residential and reunion weekend. Overall there were 13 weekends and 6 longer residentials in the Peace III programme. In addition there were two 6-day and 10 weekend residentials for cross-community groups from Avoniel, LORAG, Trinity Street, Lagan Village and Inverary in Belfast, Recon and Loughview in Holywood, Whiteabbey, and Brownies and Guides from Drumaness, Ballymena and Bangor. Throughout the year we explored the local area, teambuilding in Castle Ward, losing leaders in Castlewellan Peace Maze, swinging on ropes in Delamont, exploring Tollymore and playing on the beaches. Other activities ranged from baking to ball games, crafts to team challenges and inevitably, donkey riding. We also took part in local activities; St Patrick’s Parade; the Pirate Day and Pumpkinfest in Castleward and Down Museum’s War Time evacuation events. We continued the arts workshops and summer scheme for children from the Lecale area, enthusiastically and energetically organised and led by Judith O’Neill. Unfortunately, budgetary cutbacks and delays meant no formal referrals from Health and Social Care Trusts, though some families did manage to get placed for respite care. We are hoping to seek a solution to these referral problems in 2013 as we know, from past years, how these children, including disabled and looked after young people, can benefit from the experiences that Glebe House offers.
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Teenage programme
Peace III, Awards for All and YCNI funding allowed us to run a programme, encouraging teenagers into active citizenship. The community relations discussions were particularly stimulating and there were opportunities for fun and friendship. Through practical work, the young people developed relationships between each other and Glebe House. A Community Foundation for Northern Ireland funded programme began in December 2012.
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Volunteers
In 2012 we had volunteers from Japan, Spain, USA, Slovenia and Germany. 45 volunteers and community leaders took part in training programmes covering topics such as, Safeguarding Children, planning and organising play activities, child care and team building. I should like to thank especially that small core of dedicated individuals who turn up weekend after weekend. Being a volunteer can be highly satisfying, and great fun. We encourage anyone who might be interested to get in touch.
Karin McKinty, Youth Programme Team Leader.

Fundraising and Sponsorship
Harmony Community Trust has been funded and supported by the DHSS&PS Child Care Policy Directorate, the North Down Ards and Down Peace III Partnership, BBC Children in Need, Lloyds TSB Foundation for Northern Ireland, The Community Foundation for Northern Ireland, The Big Lottery, Awards for All, The Youth Council for Northern Ireland, The Children’s Project NI, and Down District Council . We thank them for enabling us to develop our cross-community work with disadvantaged young people and adults from local community groups. Because of the lack of statutory funding for community relations programmes with children and young people, the Peace III funding was much appreciated partly filling the void, but it continues to bring an administrative burden curtailing our capacity to fundraise elsewhere for groups from outside the cluster area. As usual we must thank the many individuals and local businesses who helped with donations and support for our various fundraising events. We have also been most appreciative of the various gifts and donations which we have received from friends of HCT and Glebe House. We were grateful to three local artists, Maggie Thomas, Brenda O’Connor and Helen Scott who gave us the proceeds from their Art Exhibition raffle. Our annual Open Day was a great success despite the opposition of the Jubilee Festivities the same weekend. We repeated our small Christmas Shop on site which proved popular with visiting groups. Gifts in kind and voluntary work help maintain the facilities and programme at a minimal cost. During the year, we benefited from the labours of DHSS&PS staff, Hendersons and Voluntary Service International in addition to our teenage groups, and a committed band of regular volunteers and committee members.
Helen Honeyman

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Open Day 2012

Summary Statement of Financial Activities Year ended 31 March 2011

Incoming resources 2012
£
2011
£
Generated funds    
Voluntary income 179,893 85,138
Activities for generating funds 6.301 6,257
Charitable activities    
Core grants 32,343 41,381
Programme activities 119,162 134,195
Total incoming resources 337,599 266,970
 
Resources expended    
Cost of generating voluntary income 5,881 6,727
Charitable activities 280,092 269,599
Governance costs 7,715 4,390
 
Total resources expended 293,688 280,716
 
Net incoming resources for year (43,911) (13,746)
Funds brought forward 432,824 446,570
Total funds carried forward 476,735 432,824
* includes restricted funds income £33,899, £32,243 and £76,518 and costs £164,476    
 
Balance Sheet 2012 2011
31 March 2011 £ £
Fixed assets 468,020 498,919
Current assets    
Debtors 86,864 64,605
Cash at bank and in hand 163 272
  89,027 64,877
Creditors falling due within one year (78,312) (130,972)
Net current liabilities (8,715) (66,095)
Net assets 476,735 432,824
 
Reserves    
Unrestricted funds- general funds (32,411) (33,303)
Restricted funds - building and capital grant 444,324 466,127
  476,735 432,824
 


The summary figures for 2012 and 2011 have been extracted from the full audited accounts.

Honorary Treasurer’s Report
The financial results for the year reflect the continuing transition from core grant funding towards programme specific funding. The Trust has benefited in the year from a donation of £100,000 from the former Children’s Project, which has contributed significantly to the improved current asset position. A further increase in programme provision has been facilitated in the year provided by specific funding whilst continuing to minimise running costs. As ever, Council remain aware of the continuing increased challenges to come from restricted sources of funding, and in particular the limited period of Peace III funding, and are devoting their efforts to seeking out and further extending the sources of income for future years. It should be noted that the current market value of the land and buildings is considered to be £0.75 million, which is considerably in excess of the carrying value in the balance sheet of £447,094.
David Boyd

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Chairperson’s Report
In a climate of government cutbacks and financial uncertainty, we greatly welcomed the extension of funding from the North Down, Ards and Down Peace III partnership phase 1 and the grant for phase 2 to support our future programmes. Also we are grateful for the continuing support of the DHSS&PS, Child Care Policy Directorate. We have seen an extended use of our facilities by local groups in the East Down area and also ones from elsewhere in Ireland. There has been an increased number and variety of programmes delivered including many new initiatives such as ones with groups from Co Louth. There were more participants in our cross-community programmes and many new groups and individuals involved.
Our AGM, held in February was combined with a special event to commemorate Dr Hylda Armstrong’s involvement in the Trust. Members of the Inner Wheel from across Ireland unveiled an Archimedes sundial in the sensory garden in memory of Hylda.
I should like to thank my fellow committee members and the many friends of Glebe House for their hard work and freely shared expertise which ensures our continued success. I must also thank the staff and volunteers without whom it would not have been possible to maintain the facilities and provide a service to the community. We continue to operate with a minimal staffing complement and tribute must be paid to the dedication and flexibility of the team, who have managed to deliver such a full range of services over the year. We are delighted that a grant from BBC Children in Need has enabled us to appoint a third worker for the residential children’s programme. We are looking forward to the future with increased optimism. There is still a role for us to play in developing a shared future for Northern Ireland, and an increasing need for the opportunities we can offer to people of all ages from disadvantaged communities and backgrounds.
Helen Honeyman

Glebe House Centre Report
One of the coldest winters with sub zero temperatures was how 2011 started off. The road between Strangford and Downpatrick was more like a toboggan track, taking nearly an hour to traverse. Eventually the frosts cleared and Glebe House swung back into action with a flurry of residential and day programmes, that have seen many new faces enjoying and exploring what makes Glebe House unique.
A year at Glebe House sees us hosting a variety of groups and organisations, all looking for special and different activities that only Glebe House can provide. In February we welcomed the Voluntary Service International workcamp committee from Dublin, for their planning weekend. This was followed in April by VSI and ourselves hosting the Service Civil International, Youth and Unemployment working group on a 5 Day seminar at Glebe House. We welcomed back the Inverary Mother and Kids group over the May bank holiday weekend, this turned out to be a fun weekend with amazing weather and even some of dads took part. During July and August we again hosted The Neighbourhood Youth Project from Dublin with two residential programmes for Dublin teenagers, from many different ethnic backgrounds.

sundial

The Harmony Community Trust AGM was held at Glebe House in February and was combined with a special event to commemorate Dr Hylda Armstrong’s involvement in the Trust. Members of the Inner Wheel Clubs of Ireland came to the event and unveiled a sundial in memory of Hylda. In March we received delivery of a Sunshine Coach from the Variety Club of Great Britain. This had been a long time coming, but was well worth the wait, being put into service immediately and easing our transport needs for the rest of the year.
We have always strived to develop the land and grounds at Glebe House. With help from groups including the Woodland Trust we have been planting trees in different areas to help improve our little bit of the environment and develop play and relaxation areas. This year with support from the Lloyds TSB Foundation for Northern Ireland, we have undertaken an extensive development. We want to enhance the areas with living willow sculptures and a variety of native trees and shrubs, creating an environment where children and adults can interact with nature in a fun but meaningful way. The project was started in September during our two week, International Workcamp when the group of volunteers assisted in a range of environmental activities. This work was further developed over the autumn by groups of Northern Ireland teenagers on community relations weekends. This exciting development that will turn a barren 2 acre field into an area rich with trees and wildlife, providing scope for all kinds of fun play activities and area for relaxing.
This year Glebe House saw 3 new staff take up their roles on the Children & Youth programme. Philip McEvoy came to us in February and worked up to the end of August. Julie Gibson from Killyleagh started in October, Julie brings a wealth of youth work experience to her post. Andrew Kelly from Strangford joined us in November, Andrew had been a part time youth leader with the Patrician YC in Downpartick, and brings a local youth knowledge to our programmes. Keeping everyone in check and providing that important office back up are Debbie Shavin and Bernie Armstrong, both excelling in the demands of the Glebe House admin. Angela Fitzpatrick assisted by Marie Hoeritzauer continues to develop and run our Adult programme with new and exciting opportunities. Karin McKinty leads the Children and Youth programme which this year has seen some fantastic new innovations and activities introduced into the programme. With Patrick O’Neill our Cook and with the voluntary assistance of Emiko Soekawa and Ivor Hill, our staff team work like a well oiled machine, even with the odd hiccup from time to time. Although not technically staff members our Donkeys do deliver a very important service at Glebe House. Besides the Donkey rides, their presence provides something that words can not explain. Their patience, good temperament, gentleness and little peculiarities bring specialness to what Glebe House is. Theao, Sargent, Doagh and Jack got a little brother back in June, Tomas joined the team and is settling in ready to join the others in year long Donkey rides.
Every year we welcome volunteers from all over the world who come for many different reasons to assist in the work of Glebe House. This year has been no different and although mentioned elsewhere in this report I would like to say a big thank you to all those volunteers who have helped out in what ever capacity over the last year, on our Open Day, Workcamp, Teenage programme, Summer Volunteering, Grounds work, Tree planting, Cleaning, Driving, Painting & Decorating and many many more. I would like to thank Kevin Sipler in particular, who came to us on a six months training programme and involved himself in all aspects of our programme, after the training programme finished Kevin has continued to volunteer with Glebe House. To all our volunteers who are too many to mention by name, Thank You all, you know who you are, and we very much appreciate your help and dedication.
As with all things in life there are the not so nice episodes that rear their ugly heads and dump on us from great heights. On the 27th September in the early hours, some not so nice people broke into the Glebe House and the Rookery buildings. They caused a lot of damage to doors, windows and floors, they stole the safe from the office and took one of the minibuses (thankfully not the new one). The safe had a few hundred pounds in it and the minibus was found 2 days later completely wrecked, just outside Downpatrick. This was a futile act that caused distress to our staff and interfered with our all our programmes, it caused damage to Glebe House and the loss of a minibus has added to our transport costs considerably. It is disheartening to think that people could do this to a charity, but we are well aware, that today very few things are respected. We can only hope that this episode will not be repeated.
Besides the above we have had a great year at Glebe House, with fun packed community relations programmes, new exciting developments and a flow of satisfied visitors from across Northern Ireland and beyond. The summer weather was great even with the odd downpour. Once again we were supported by local people, shops and businesses that have helped in so many ways over the year. I would like to thank, the staff of DHSS&PS Castle Building, Stormont, for their help in the garden and grounds. Thomas Duffy and sons Strangford & Killlough, for their continued support over the year. The residents of Hamilton Fold, Ballynahinch for their help at Open Day and Meabh Polly who continues to surprise me regarding the contents of her attic.
Thank you for your help and support in making 2011 a great year at Glebe House
Diarmaid Mc Garrigle
Centre Manager


Adult Programme
This year’s Adult Programme has seen a constant development over the year thanks to the funding from Peace III and the Arts council for NI. Groups and individuals have continued to meet each other and cement positive relationships. They look forward to these meetings with enthusiasm, exchanging information and news of the various activities carried on within their own community groups and areas. Indeed it was interesting to note that two of the groups have already started to work with each other on separate programmes. The themed “get together” days provided the opportunity to show off their creative Skills with the musicians encouraging them to join more freely in the singing and dancing.
In February representatives of local community groups welcomed a group from the Indian Community to Glebe House and shared an enjoyable session, of arts & crafts. The Cross border photography group held an exhibition at Carlingford and Glebe House, with a great selection of works on display during the exhibitions.
The study tours proved as popular as ever and were always well supported. They provided ample opportunity to explore our heritage at Newgrange and Knowth and Armagh and Stormont. At Lisburn museum the adults reminisced about life in the linen mills while recounting tales of the rattle of the looms and the chitter chatter of the workers. In the Nautilis Centre we had a lively discussion on the fishing practices of Ardglass and Kilkeel. At Stormont we watched our local politicians in action at a Question Time session. Overall those who took part in the programme were given many opportunities to discuss different aspects of life in Northern Ireland in relaxed and informal situations. Feedback was positive and encouraging.

arts

In the autumn new workshops were set up for community groups both at Glebe House and outreach centres funded through the Arts for Older people’s programme. All of the classes provided opportunities for those involved to explore different crafts, meet new people, have a chat and work in a small group. This helped the participants build confidence in their own ability, take pride in what they produced and gain the admiration of colleagues. Not alone did these programmes provide openings for the practice of new skills but also allowed people to get to know and appreciate the work of local artists. In addition to our established tutors they met Anthea Mc Williams and her colleagues from “dance to the memories”, Pauline Matthews with her bead craft, Bernie Sutton with her pottery and mosaic skills, Catherine Dickson textile artist and woodcraft artists Tony Rea and Geoff Tulip. It is important at this time to say a big “thank you” to all our volunteers who were always ready and willing when called upon to instruct, drive or offer help with hospitality.
Angela Fitzpatrick
Adult Team Leader

Children & Youth Programme

Over the last number of years our Children and Youth programme has been significantly assisted by funding from the SEUPB’s North Down, Ards and South Down Peace III partnership. This has enabled us to develop and expand our community relations work within the three council areas. Last year was to see the end of the funding but thankfully due to an extension we were able to continue our work up to the end of July. This gave us the opportunity to plan our CR programme to the end of the summer and this forward planning helped our programme of activities run much more smoothly. With the extension to the Peace III funding and then with the successful application for Phase 2 for this funding it has allowed us to extend the community relations programme, and allowed us to further develop our work in this area with community groups which included: East End Ards; Ballyhornan; Langley Road, Ballynahinch; Recon, Holywood; Murlough CA, Newcastle; Loughview/Redburn, Holywood; Vincent’s Downpatrick; West winds, Newtownards; St Finian’s, Newtownards; Ardglass; Ballyhalbert. The pairings across these communities were continued during the year and this helped to develop relationships between groups and to expand links further. The programme of activities involved a number of residential breaks taking place during the school holiday period and weekends during the year.
The weather was changeable throughout the year, from a freezing winter, to a damp summer and then a very mild autumn and winter. It offered some planning challenges, but the facilities at Glebe House offered plenty of options. Imaginative icebreakers and team games which are always popular, whether they are played indoors or out, and ongoing enthusiasm from all concerned meant great times regardless of weather. All the usual local locations, such as Castleward, Delamont, Castlewellan, Exploris, Downpatrick, Bangor and Newcastle provided a wide programme of events. We were pirates in Castleward and war time evacuees in Down County Museum.

donkey

The Donkeys are ever popular with all our visitors and this year saw the arrival of Thomas, a young brown donkey and a cheeky personality. Theao and Jack had an unexpected adventure in the summer when they had to be rescued by the fire brigade. Excellent team work from volunteers, community leaders and children in keeping all calm helped ensure a happy outcome all round.
Other children’s groups who spent weekends with us were: Avoniel, Lorag, Inverary, Sandy Row, and 9th Bangor Brownies/Guides.
New groups were especially welcome and with BBC Children in Need funding we were able to support such groups from Whiteabbey, Edgarstown Portadown and Unity within our partnered holiday programmes. Once again we welcomed children on respite programmes, sponsored by SEHSST, although this has been reduced over the last number of years because of cut backs it is still seen by us a very important part of our programme, offering help to some of the more disadvantaged in our society.
The annual Summer Scheme run by Judith O’Neill took place in August, with 23 local children taking part in a week long arts and crafts themed programme. Thanks to Peace III funding we were able to run a Saturday Arts Clubs for more local children in November and December. These take place in batches of three prior to key holiday dates with around 20 children attending each Saturday.
Teenage Programme
With funding from the Youth Council for NI, this Teenage Programme was run during the summer and autumn to provide a programme of activities, experience and skills training for young people in the mid teen range. The programme brought young people into a series of residentials to consider how they might participate in their own communities. Focusing on volunteering and practical work projects has been an effective methodology for community relations group work and team building. Open to all, the young people were drawn from areas including:
Annalong, Ardglass, Ballyhornan, Bangor, Belfast, Crossgar, Downpatrick, Holywood (Redburn estate), Kircubbin, Newcastle, Newtownards, Portadown, Portaferry, and Whiteabbey.

teens

The scheme ran over 4 weekends with a total of 42 young people and 16 volunteers. Often young people bonded exceptionally well, with substantial interaction continuing after the scheme had ended. In addition to onsite activities including wood gathering, ground clearance and preparation and tree planting they took part in teambuilding activities, facing challenges such as Quad Biking, Archery, Zip Line and finding their way through the peace maze in Castlewellan. The young people heard the benefits of volunteering from speakers involved in youth work, and community relations challenges produced good natured discussion and resulted in considerable positive comments and feedback.
Volunteers
Last year we had 10 International summer volunteers from: Ireland, Scotland, USA, Slovenia, Bulgaria, Italy and the Czech Republic. The volunteers took part in our summer residential programme, working closely with the children’s groups over this period. These volunteers bring a very special dimension to our programme, with the volunteers sharing their experience of their home countries and bringing a world flavour to our work.
Glebe recruits local volunteers through out the year to participate in all of our programmes. We want to bring in new volunteers to experience Glebe House and anyone who feels they would enjoy this is invited to contact our offices to express an interest. Volunteer leader training is a very important to the success of all of our activities, each year we run a number of weekend training events covering a wide range of topics relating to the work the volunteers will be involved in. The leader trainings produced some great activity ideas and allowed us to benefit from shared experience, in addition to ensuring leaders had the best possible experience with their groups at Glebe House.
Karin McKinty
Children & Youth Team Leader

IN MEMORIAM
paul
PAUL BUTTON

July 2011 brought the sad news of Paul Button’s death after a long period of ill-health. Paul was a long term supporter and member of the Harmony Community Trust Council. He brought to Glebe House his many skills and experience as a coastguard and member of the local community as well as the support of all his family members as volunteers and fundraisers. He is greatly missed.

Fundraising and Sponsorship
Harmony Community Trust has been funded and supported by the DHSS&PS Child Care Policy Directorate, the North Down Ards and Down Peace III Partnership, BBC Children in Need, The Youth Council for Northern Ireland, Lloyds TSB Foundation for Northern Ireland, Down District Council and Ards Borough Council. We thank them for enabling us to develop our cross-community work with young people and adults from local community groups. We experienced in full the effect of the loss of Department of Education funding for community relations work in the lack of programme related grants to Youth Services and local community groups, and the Peace III funding was much appreciated partly filling the void. But it brought an administrative burden which curtailed our capacity to fundraise elsewhere.
However at the tail end of the year we were fortunate to be the beneficiaries of a substantial donation from the Children’s Project (NI), enabling us to re-capitalise the organisation. We are extremely grateful to the Children’s Project (NI) and their American supporters, but regret that the donation resulted from the need to close their organisation after many years of excellent work in community relations with young people. They were a victim of Department of Education cutbacks.
As usual we must thank the many individuals and local businesses who helped with donations and support for our various fundraising events. We have also been most appreciative of the various gifts and donations which we have received from friends of HCT and Glebe House. In particular we were grateful for donations in memory of Paul Button and Dr Hylda Armstrong. Our annual Open Day was a great success despite the rainy morning which meant cancelling some activities. Instead of a Christmas Fair we ran a small Christmas Shop on site which proved popular with visiting groups.
Gifts in kind and voluntary work help maintain the facilities and programme at a minimal cost. During the year, we benefited from the labours of DHSS&PS staff, and Voluntary Service International in addition to our teenage groups, and a committed band of regular volunteers and committee members.
Helen Honeyman

Honorary Treasurer’s Report

The financial results for the year reflect the continuing transition from core grant funding towards programme specific funding. A significant increase in programme provision has been facilitated in the year provided by specific funding whilst continuing to minimise running costs. As ever, Council remain aware of the continuing increased challenges to come from restricted sources of funding and are devoting their efforts to seeking out and further extending the sources of income for future years.
It should be noted that the current market value of the land and buildings is considered to be £0.75 million, which is considerably in excess of the carrying value in the balance sheet of £447,094. Fundraising will continue to be an essential part of the financial imperative for the Trust in securing the resources to provide the strong base for the ongoing development of activities in the coming years.
David Boyd


Summary Statement of Financial Activities Year ended 31 March 2011

Incoming resources 2010
£
2011
£
Generated funds    
Voluntary income 57,115 63,578
Activities for generating funds 5,848 6,257
Charitable activities    
Core grants 96,561 41,381
Programme activities 82,700 155,754
Total incoming resources 242,224 266,970
 
Resources expended    
Cost of generating voluntary income 6,073 6,727
Charitable activities 211,083 269,599
Governance costs 4,390 5,250
 
Total resources expended 222,406 280,716
 
Net incoming resources for year (19,818) (13,746)
Funds brought forward 426,752 446,570
Total funds carried forward 446,570 432,824
* includes restricted funds income £22,600 and costs £16,276    
 
Balance Sheet 2010 2011
31 March 2011 £ £
Fixed assets 487,858 498,919
Current assets 30,940  64,605 
Debtors 507 272
Cash at bank and in hand 31,447 64,877
 
Creditors falling due within one year (72,735) (130,972)
Net current liabilities (41,288) (66,095)
Net assets 446,570 432,824
 
Reserves    
Unrestricted funds- general funds (13,223) (33,303)
Restricted funds - building and capital grant 459,803 466,127
  446,570 432,824
 

The summary figures for 2011 and 2010 have been extracted from the full audited accounts.




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CHAIRPERSONS REPORT:

Funding uncertainties and changing policies in the statutory services have continued to affect us throughout the year. After 35 years of valuable service and commitment to the peace process in Northern Ireland, we would have expected to have reached a level of financial stability which would enable us to concentrate on developing our programmes to meet the changing needs of the community, as well as the aims and objectives of Harmony Community Trust. Funding from the North Down Ards and Down Peace III partnership has been greatly welcomed as it has enabled us to develop the objectives which were formulated and revised at our annual think tanks in November 2008 and 2009, to increase the Glebe House programmes for children, young people and adults from the North Down, Ards and Down Districts. It has been encouraging to see the extended use of our facilities by local groups, and those from the Greater Belfast area, and elsewhere. Despite the severe blow struck by the ending of Department of Education Community Relations funding and delays in getting budgets set for the HSS Trusts, it has been a successful year of programmes delivered by HCT.
It is always difficult to pick out highlights from our diversity of activities, but the spirit of Glebe House was exemplified by the atmosphere created by the international and local volunteers during the summer children’s programme; the study trips to places of cultural and historical significance for adults from North Down, Ards and Down; the visit of Snow Patrol and Children in Need on the day before Open Day; the theme days for seniors; the conflict study trip for Juniata College students and the development of new cross-border links.
Overall, we have provided 6,125 child/person days to 1,520 disadvantaged children, young people and 1567 adults. There were 59 different groups making use of our facilities and volunteers from 18 different countries.
I should like to thank my fellow committee members and the many friends of Glebe House for their hard work and freely shared expertise which ensures the continued success of Harmony Community Trust. I must also thank the staff and volunteers without whom it would not have been possible to maintain the facilities and provide a service to the community. We operate with a minimal staffing complement and tribute must be paid to the dedication and flexibility of the team, who have managed to deliver such a full range of services over the year. We have been grateful for the continuing support of our statutory funders, the DHSS&PS, the NDAD Peace III Partnership, the BELB and Down District Council. We have been delighted that we have continued to be supported by the South Eastern HSC Trust. The experience of Glebe House is particularly rewarding for the children and young people referred by the Trust. We were also delighted to receive further funding from the Youth Council NI to develop a Teenage workcamp programme in 2011.
We are looking forward to the future despite continued uncertainty with regard to Government Policy for Community Relations as well as the certainty that statutory funding for the voluntary sector will be heavily reduced. We know that there is still an important role for Harmony Community Trust to play in developing a shared future for the people of Northern Ireland, and that there is a particular need for our work in the North Down, Ards and Down area.
Helen Honeyman


CENTRE MANAGER’S REPORT:


2010 started off with freezing cold temperatures and the usual reorganising, sorting and putting away of decorations and the ghosts of Christmas and the Old Year Past.
Denise Fitzpatrick started in post as Programme worker in early January and although this was a short-term post Denise immersed herself into the role from the start. She worked on the children’s, YCNI, & Peace III youth programmes and was fully involved in the summer residential programme, Denise finished in September to return to teaching.
Karin McKinty took up her post in early June. As Programme worker she has worked on the Peace III youth programme. Karin has brought to Glebe House her considerable skills and many years experience as a Guider and has enhanced the programme delivered to the many children and youth groups that avail of our resources.
Johnny Watson, who has worked as Programme worker over the last 3 years finished his time with us just before Christmas. Johnny’s youth work and community relations background helped us to develop a sound approach in the delivery of our children and youth programmes. His steady non-flustered attitude to his work has been a great example of tolerance and understanding to us all. We wish him well in his new role as Good Relations Officer in Castlereagh Council.
The past year was dominated by the Peace III programme which has helped us to reach out to the Co Down community, and in so doing has expanded the usage and knowledge of Glebe House to a new group of visitors in the area. With new programmes and new groups, as with a baby, have come all the teething problems and nurturing needs. Our babies were bigger and older but still demanded as much attention. A big thank you must go to all our staff working with these new groups and in particular Angela Fitzpatrick and Marie Hoeritzauer, who have worked on our adult programme. This programme has gone from strength to strength over the last year and is now well established in our yearly programme of activities. Marie and Angela have developed this programme with inclusion as one of its main objectives and have geared this to an activity based programme that meets the needs of the participants.
The harsh cold winds at the start of the year subsided as spring and early summer approached. Snowdrops, Daffodils and then Bluebells appeared. Rooks dropped twigs as they made their nests. Buds turned to blossoms and leaves finally reappeared to clothe the naked trees.
In March we sadly said goodbye to Alice, one of our oldest donkeys. She had been at Glebe House for over 30 years and despite her bad legs and unique stubbornness brought joy to a lot of children over the years.
juniata
Juniata Collage May 10
This year we welcomed visitors from far and near to the sunny shores of Strangford Lough and the soft rains of Kilclief.
Students and teachers from Juniata College, Pennsylvania, stayed with us for two weeks in May on a study tour looking at Northern Ireland and its history, politics, countryside and culture. They showed great interest in Northern Ireland so we organised a trip around the northern counties and even fitted in Co Donegal. With visits to the Giants Causeway, Derry’s Walls, the Ulster Folk Park and the Omagh Remembrance Garden, the group saw the sights and marvelled at the incredibly hot Irish weather. Besides the study element of this project the group also found time to help us get ready for the annual Open Day.
The Community of St John the Baptist spent a long weekend with us in June, a time of reflection was had by the participants, with Glebe House offering a more spiritual aspect to its facilities. In the summer and the autumn we hosted, the Neighbourhood Youth Project from Dublin, with a youth sports programme and their Irish / German exchange programme. The week residentials saw them take part in a range of activities to help develop friendships and understanding.
We would like to thank all the groups who made use of our facilities over the last year and wish them well.
The summer programme at Glebe House runs from late June to the end of August and each year we recruit volunteers from home and abroad to help out over this very busy period, of non-stop children’s residential programmes.
Frances Jennings from the USA arrived at the beginning of July and stayed until mid August, getting involved in every aspect of the children’s activities. Frances was a next generation volunteer, following in her mother Sue’s footsteps.
We welcomed back Marie Therese Keating from Dublin on her second stint as a summer volunteer, and taking a well earned break from her studies.
Tom Stabbler from England was a late applicant but quickly made up for it in his ability to motivate and enthuse all those taking part in the summer games and activities.
Moriz from Austria managed to squeeze a bit of our summer programme into his hectic university studies.
Gerard McWilliams from Belfast, freshly returned from receiving a prestigious Lion Award at the City & Guild’s Medal of Excellence for volunteering, was once again one of our key volunteers over the summer.
Assisting these volunteers were a wealth of community workers, teachers, youth and play workers, community volunteers and the other Glebe House volunteers including, Claire, Margaret, Shelly, Maureen, Janet, Pauline, Mary, Makiko, Sharon, Rob, Catharine, Mairead, Mark, Ross, Kevin, Nicola, Anne and our evaluators, Seamus, Paul, Helen, Sharon and Maureen.
The summer of 2010 turned out to be one that will stick in our minds, with some of the best weather for a long time, hardly a day went by without a trip to the beach, with buckets and spades at the ready.
Each year we end our summer period with an International Workcamp. This has been organised in conjunction with Service Civil International and their Irish branch Voluntary Service International. The September Workcamp ran for two weeks with a great group of volunteers from Finland, Poland, Japan, England, Serbia, Czech Republic and Northern Ireland. With the last of the great summer weather we were able to carry out a lot of gardening and outdoor jobs. A big thank to Laura, Anna, Justyna, Fumiyai, Ivana, John, Rob, Patrick and a special thanks to Gerard for his painting and decorating skills.
2010 was a good year at Glebe House with a great mix of people coming to enjoy the variety and wide range of experiences that Glebe House has to offer, young and old, from near or far.
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DHSS&PS work day Sept 10
We hope that all our friends and visitors have had as wonderful a time with us as we have had in hosting them. As usual the grey shadowy spectres of recession and cutbacks loom on the horizon, but we will go on with a little help from our friends.
Thank you all.
Diarmaid McGarrigle

ADULT PROGRAMMES


Funding through the NDAD Peace III partnership played an important role in extending our work with adults through the Down, Ards, North Down and Louth area. Our activities have ranged from digital photography classes at Peninsula Healthy Living Partnership in Kircubbin to a visit to the Patrick Kavanagh Centre in Co. Monaghan. These classes and study visits provided platforms for people from various backgrounds to meet each other and form relationships. Information about activities was sent to community groups known to Glebe House through previous contacts and to new contacts in the Ards and Down areas.
strawknot
Making Straws dolls Oct 10
The year started with a group of 35 adults from Greyabbey, Millisle, Newtownards, Killyleagh, Adglass and Castlewellan who travelled to Carlingford in Co.Louth for a guided tour of the Boyne Centre. We also included tuition in Irish dancing. A return visit was arranged for March when the Northerners showed off the Down Museum and were taken on a tour of Killyleagh Castle led by the owner, Colonel Hamilton.
Three Easter theme days provided an opportunity for the crafty folk to show off their skills in making Easter Bonnets and to reminisce about the war by sharing photos, songs and experiences. In total 80 adults from Killyleagh, Killinchy, Ardglass, Balynahinch, Ballyhornan and Strangford took part. Autumn days brought together people to enjoy making harvest knots and story telling as well as the usual chatting, dining and dancing. Just before the winter winds and snow the year’s activities were finished off with making pretty little Christmas boxes and a variety of jewellery.
Glebe House worked with Age NI on two Senior Days. In May Glebe House held an Open Day with a variety of workshops in spinning and weaving, willowcraft, gold panning and calligraphy. In September we had a great night of storytelling, music and song ably hosted at Glebe House by Diarmaid. Over 50 people enjoyed local tales by Ulster Scots storytellers Will Mc Avoy and Willie Cromie of BBC fame.
During the year we organised very successful classes at Glebe House and in Kirkcubbin in basic computing and digital photography tailored to individual needs and allowing for interaction of participants. The dance classes in Portavogie which we arranged were enjoyed by 20 adults who took to the floor displaying varying levels of expertise. Following a very well attended Family History Clinic held over three weeks in Castlewellan, we decided to spread our wings and take this series of classes to the Ards Peninsula in Kircubbin and Portavogie in February 2011. Creativity was catered for by the Pottery classes at Coney Island. In total over 50 adults took part in the classes. During the classes a break time for a cup of tea provided a chance for people to socialise and exchange ideas and experience. Links with Carlingford and our study tours combined with the digital photography classes were the stimulus for developing a group of people from Down and Ards, interested in improving their camera skills, sharing knowledge and experience of the local area and making new friends. Tuition was provided by Gavin Byrne, a professional photographer from Carlingford the various workshops have resulted in photographs printed and mounted for two cross-border exhibitions to be held in February in Carlingford and Glebe House.
Study Tours
These were a new initiative for Glebe House, developed as part of our Peace II programmes. The objective was to give people from a variety of backgrounds a chance to explore the hidden gems and history of Ards and Down, to learn more about their locality and each other and also to stimulate discussion about similarity and diversity.
Adults from Killyleagh, Greyabbey, Ardglass, Ballynahinch, Castlewellan and Drumaness visited Mountstewart and the Abbey ruins in Greyabbey and heard stories of the local area in Ulster Scots. The Spelga Special tour in June included a visit to Annalong Cornmill and our guide Myrtle told stories of the Mournes. We enjoyed the company of our cross border link group, Omeath Active Retired group. The weather was bright, the Mournes resplendent and everyone had a great day.
Tough Times” was the name of the tour on 1st July. The day started with a visit to the site of the United Irishmen’s Battle in Saintfield with Cllr Albert Colmer as our guide. We went on to the Somme Centre to learn about the two world wars. The conclusion drawn by most participants was that these were indeed “tough times”. In contrast on 12th August the emphasis was firmly on the future as we all learned about alternative sources of energy. Dr. Burkett of QUB Marine Biology Station explained how the Sea Gem marine turbine operated and we appreciated the importance of windpower, in the past and the future, when we went on to Ballycopeland Windmill.
indiancom
Visit to the Indian Centre Nov 10
In visiting Clifton House, the Islamic Centre and Indian Community Centre participants learned about different cultures and are arranging reciprocal visits to Glebe House in the New Year. It was reassuring and rewarding to listen to the conversations and discussions that arose both during mealtimes and on the journeys. Over the year friendships have developed and people expressed an interest in looking at the issues of historical and current, social, political and religious differences.
We feel we went some way towards achieving our aim of giving people of different backgrounds an opportunity to meet and participate in discussions. Given the funding, we intend to follow up on similar activities which stimulate people to discuss their role in developing a truly shared community and society.
Angela Fitzpatrick and Marie Hoeritzauer

CHILDREN’S AND YOUTH PROGRAMMES


The programmes with children and young people have been notable this year in that we have embarked on several new initiatives and at the same time been able to continue some established projects even with difficulties with statutory funding agency budgets and allocations, which were beyond our control.
dishofgirls
A swinging dish of girls
From January until Easter we completed the Community Relations reunions from 2009 and the Convent of Mercy and Westwinds Primary Schools used Glebe House for their cultural diversity project facilitated by ArtsExta. The cessation of Department of Education funding for community relations work seriously affected our work in these areas in the new financial year. We also finished the Spectrum programme for learning disabled children and their siblings and the Stepthrough Programme for learning disabled teenagers. These latter two programmes were funded by the Belfast Trust Disability Team and unfortunately we were unable to continue with these groups, as funding was not forthcoming for the year. Over the years our respite activities with disabled young people have been much appreciated by the children and their parents and we are sorry that it is suffering because of the cutbacks in Social Services budgets.
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However, looking on the bright side the cold months of January to March were busy with the setting up of three new programmes: the Teenage Active Citizenship Project funded by YCNI and two Peace III projects for children and young people from Down, Ards and North Down Districts. Despite the uncertain weather a great time was had by all, with icebreakers, team building, arts and crafts and fun games in the positive environment that is Glebe House. There were trips out, which included, for the older age groups, adventure activities at Greenhill YMCA and Carlingford Outdoor Centre. Children and young people came from Ardglass, Strangford, Ballyhornan, Downpatrick and Newtonards.
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Crossborder music group Dec 10
The Easter period was taken up with the continuation of the first Teenage Active Citizenship Project and the young people enjoyed a visit to Stormont as well as the Ice Bowl. Inverary Community Centre visited for a family weekend in early May. As we moved into May and June everyone was busy preparing for the Summer Programme with preparatory weekends, and the start of the second Teenage Project. Groups involved in these programmes were East End, Breezemount, Bunscoil Bheanna Boirche, Castlewellan, Rathenraw Youth Club, Sandy Row and Ballyhornan Community Associations
The summer programme was a very positive experience in terms of programme, volunteers, community leaders, staff and most of all the children. It was helped by the sunny weather. Apart from the Peace III programmes described below we had groups from Rathenraw in Antrim, The Flying Horse in Downpatrick, Sandy Row, Lower Ormeau and Avoniel in Belfast, as well as individuals and family groups from Bangor, Ards, and Lisburn. There were lots of activities and opportunities for the groups, from fishing to the ever longstanding activity of donkey rides, walks and trails, arts and crafts, campfires and sandcastles. The trips out included Newcastle, Lisburn Leisureplex, Adventure farm, and Castleward. The weeks just flew by.
The YCNI teenage Project was wound up with a residential in July and we ran a one week Summer Scheme in August for local children which was a great success, thanks to the organisation and leadership of Judith O’Neill. Some impressive arts and crafts were produced. September to December were again busy months with weekend reunions for the summer groups which all went well and evaluations with the volunteers and community groups. Through the busy schedule of residentials we also made plans for the continuation of the Peace III programmes. A Christmassy weekend for children referred through the South Eastern Trust brought to an end another busy and exciting year for children and young people at Glebe House.

Peace III Youth Programmes
The programmes initiated in 2009, Carlingford Link and Concordia were extended in 2010 and the Down-Louth youth programme which got underway in the autumn.

Carlingford Link
This is a partnership between Harmony Community Trust and Carlingford Community Development. The programme consisted of 4 paired residential weekends for young people between 10 and 16 drawn from North Down, Ards, Down district and Carlingford. The programme provided young people with an opportunity to gain a sense of our shared and differing history and cultural heritage, while building relationships between young people across these areas. As the areas share a common interest in outdoor activities some weekends allowed young people to team build through such challenges as High Ropes and water sports. This was very popular, with the physical activities creating a common ground for fun and friendship. Other weekends took a more relaxed approach: Carlingford has a shared heritage music programme, allowing us to mix local youths from flute bands and Irish music traditions. By attending a festival performance in Carlingford the young people saw how the same tunes had moved across cultural boundaries, with differing words and rhythms. To date this programme has involved 107 youth days. Children came from Hollywood, Ballyhornan, Newtownards, Downpatrick, Ballynahinch and Ardglass.

The Concordia Programme
Groups were made up from paired, catholic and protestant community groups and offered a series of residential experiences with the emphasis of promoting better understanding of differences and similarities. Each group had an introductory weekend in the Spring, a full week during the summer holidays and a reunion weekend in the Autumn. Children referred by the South East Health and Social Care Trust were mixed into groups as space allowed. This programme proved very popular with community leaders reporting ongoing interaction between not only the groups themselves, but between children on a personal social level. The vast majority of groups took part in all three residentials and are already asking about any upcoming programmes. Participating groups were from Westwinds, East End and St Finians PS in Newtownards; Beechmount and Loughview/Redburn in North Down; Ballyhornan, Vincent’s Downpatrick and the Castlewellan Bunscoil in Down.
team
The Down and Louth Youth Programme
This new initiative involved the commissioning of an audit of local youth groups in County Louth, North Down, Ards and Down district to build up a database of groups who would be interested in developing cross-community and cross-border links. The audit exercise had the added value of marketing the work of Glebe House. Cross-community groups of 12 to 16 year olds were established to participate in residential weekends north and south as well as day trips. We offered programme themes, which are popular with the age group. The first pair of weekends offered Manga Art classes and Hip Hop dance, with additional craft options such as jewellery. The second pair draws upon sporty teens, offering outdoor pursuit challenges. The Get to Know You Day saw 26 young people in the Carlingford Adventure Centre.
Karin McKinty

IN MEMORIAM


Sadly, this past year, we bade farewell to two valued friends of Glebe House, Dr Hylda Armstrong one of the founders of Glebe House and Briege Dempster a long serving volunteer since 1975.
hylda
Hylda Armstrong acted as matchmaker between International Voluntary Service and the Rotary Club of Belfast, which led to the founding of Harmony Community Trust and the purchase of Glebe House in 1975. After begging and borrowing furniture and furnishings to ensure the House could welcome children from Belfast and Derry that first summer, Hylda continued her commitment to Glebe House. With her Inner Wheel connections, Hylda was a tireless one-woman promotion agent for Glebe House throughout the British Isles and further afield, continuing to support us up until the last few years when ill health curtailed her public activities. We were delighted that Hylda’s grandson Owen from America was able to visit Glebe House this summer.
briege
Briege Dempster first participated as a volunteer at Glebe House in 1975. Over the years Briege, who volunteered on children’s holidays and weekends, was involved with the teenage workcamps and organised groups of children from Turf Lodge to participate in various cross-community and cross-border programmes. She also recruited various members of her family as volunteers. Briege was particularly involved over the years with the Spectrum and Stepthrough Groups for learning disabled children and young people and their siblings. She will be fondly remembered by many children, volunteers and staff.

FUNDRAISING AND SPONSORSHIP:

Over the last year Harmony Community Trust has been funded and supported by the DHSS&PS Childcare Policy Directorate,The Department of Foreign Affairs Dublin, Down District Council, The South Eastern and the Belfast HSC Trusts, the BELB CR Scheme, the YCNI, BBC Children in Need, The Irish Youth Foundation, Hendersons Ltd, and the North Down, Ards and Down Peace III Partnership. We thank them all for their support enabling us to develop our cross-community work with children, young people and adults from local community groups. Unfortunately one of our funders for the past 34 years, the DE Community Cohesion Unit, made the policy decision to cease funding the various organisations like ourselves, who deliver positive community relations programmes for children and young people. This cessation of Department of Education Community Relations funding has seriously affected the service we can offer. Because of a lack of grants to the Education and Library Board Community Relations Schemes, youth clubs and community organisations , there is a knock on effect in groups ability to contribute to the costs of our programmes. As usual we must thank local businesses and individuals who helped us with donations and funding for our various fundraising events. We have also been most appreciative of the various gifts and donations which we have received from friends of HCT and Glebe House. In particular this year we were grateful for a bequest from our past Founder and President, Dr Harry Corscadden. It has been heartening to know that there is so much good will directed towards our various activities. Without this support it would be impossible for our work to continue. Our annual Open Day was a great success with many new visitors and blessed by good weather. We repeated the Christmas Fair in partnership with the Ballyhornan Mustard Seed Group, and Ardglass Friendship Club, but unfortunately attendance was seriously affected by the freezing weather. Gifts in kind and voluntary work help us maintain the property, facilities and programmes. The British Government’s “Big Society” idea, has been a reality for HCT over the last 35 years.
Fundraising is a relentless necessity for the organisation, and with a very busy programme of activities and a small staff and committee team it is hard to maintain the momentum. However we are determined to continue the work to which HCT has been dedicated since 1974, meeting the needs of the Northern Ireland community. We would welcome support, ideas and volunteers!

HONORARY TREASURER’S REPORT

We are pleased to report that the Trust has managed the necessary transition process from fulfilled programmes and funding sources to the creation of innovatory programmes attracting new funders and in continuing to minimise the running costs, we have achieved a small surplus on activities for the year. Council remain aware of the increased challenges to come from reductions in core grants and are devoting their efforts to seeking out and extending the sources of income. It should be noted that the current market value of the land and buildings is considered to be £0.9 million, which is in excess of the carrying value in the balance sheet of £447,094. Fundraising continues to be an essential part of the imperative for the Trust in securing the resources to provide a strong base for development.
David Boyd

Summary Statement of Financial Activities Year ended 31 March 2010

Incoming resources 2010
£
2009
£
Generated funds    
Voluntary income 57,115 48,212
Activities for generating funds 5,848 6,461
Charitable activities    
Core grants 96,561 104,331
Programme activities 82,700 145,781
Total incoming resources 242,224 304,785
 
Resources expended    
Cost of generating voluntary income 6,073 7,510
Charitable activities 211,083 220,521
Governance costs 5,250 5,250
 
Total resources expended 222,406 233,281
 
Net incoming resources for year (19,818) 71,504
Funds brought forward 426,752 355,248
Total funds carried forward 446,570 426,752
* includes restricted funds income £nil and costs £16,442    
 
Balance Sheet 2010 2009
31 March 2010 £ £
Fixed assets 487,858 496,787
Current assets 30,940  11,465 
Debtors 507 6
Cash at bank and in hand 31,447 11,471
 
Creditors falling due within one year (72,735) (81,506)
Net current liabilities (41,288) (70,035)
Net assets 446,570 426,752
 
Reserves    
Unrestricted funds- general funds (13,223) (49,493)
Restricted funds - building and capital grant 459,803 476,245
  446,570 426,752
 

The summary figures for 2010 and 2009 have been extracted from the full audited accounts.





annual report 2009

Reportcover09

CHAIRPERSON’S REPORT
Despite ongoing uncertainty of funding from statutory sources, 2009 turned out to be a year of change and optimism for Glebe House. We continued to develop programmes to meet the changing needs of the community as well as the aims and objectives of Harmony Community Trust and were pleased to see the increasing use of Glebe House by groups of children, young people and adults from the North Down, Ards and Down Districts, part of the strategic plan developed in 2008.In the autumn we were delighted to receive Peace III Partnership funding to develop three programmes with community groups in the area during 2010, as well as grants from the Irish Department of Foreign Affairs, Down District Council and Awards for All. Details of these P3P activities are given later in the Report. It has been encouraging to see the extended use of our facilities by local groups, as well as those from the Greater Belfast area, and elsewhere. It is difficult to pick out highlights from our diversity of activities, but the spirit of Glebe House was exemplified by the day when we re-named the Orchard building in honour of Harry Corscadden, the pioneering force in the creation and development of Harmony Community Trust; the atmosphere created by the international volunteers during the summer children’s programme; the busy day in September when we had a day programme for 90 Senior Citizens combined with a Senior Management Group from Hendersons working hard in our garden; and finally the December Christmas fair weekend run in partnership with Ardglass Friendship Club and The Mustard Seed from Ballyhornan. Overall, we have provided 6,304 child/person days to 3,413 disadvantaged children, young people and adults. There were 48 different groups making use of our facilities and volunteers from 18 different countries. As in previous years, I should like to thank my fellow committee members and the many friends of Glebe House, for their hard work and freely shared expertise, which ensures the continued success of Harmony Community Trust. I must also thank the staff and volunteers, without whom it would not have been possible to maintain the facilities and provide a service to the community. We operate with a minimal staffing complement and tribute must be paid to the dedication and flexibility of the team, who have managed to deliver such a full range of services over the year. We have been grateful for the continuing support of our statutory funders, the Department of Education Community Cohesion Unit, the DHSS&PS, the BELB, Down District Council. We have been delighted that we have continued to be supported by the South Eastern HSC Trust and the Belfast HSCT Disability Team. The cross-community residentials with children and young people referred by these trusts have been particularly rewarding. We were also delighted to receive funding from the Youth Council NI to develop a programme with teenagers into 2010. We are looking forward to the future, despite continued uncertainty with regard to Government Policy for programmes and voluntary organisations promoting positive Community Relations which will contribute to our future diverse but peaceful and inclusive society in Northern Ireland. From booking already made for 2010 we know that there is still an important role for Harmony Community Trust to play in developing a shared future for the people of Northern Ireland.
Helen Honeyman
art
summer play scheme crafts

CROSS-COMMUNITY ADULT PROGRAMMES
2009 brought to a close the New Skills4all programme supported by Peace 2 but various groups continued to request courses. Classes in basic computer skills and digital photography were carried on throughout the year. Interaction among participants was good with people feeling at ease to discuss diverse topics. Particular attention was directed towards groups of senior citizens. Contacts were extended in the Down area as far as Kilcoo and Drumaness and inroads were made into the Ards. At Easter almost 100 people took part in a two-day festival of craft activities and music. Groups from Downpatrick, Killyleagh, Killinchy, Ballynahinch, Strangford, Kilcoo, Castlewellan, Ardglass and Ballyhornan soaked up the atmosphere of Glebe House. New friendships were established in a friendly informal way. At these gatherings group members exchanged ideas about activities carried out in their own communities. Consequently some groups have set up direct links with each other. In September Glebe House hosted a group of senior citizens from the Ards for East Down Rural Community Network. Ballywalter, Kircubbin, Greyabbey, Lisbane and Killinchy were all represented. 90 people in total attended. Many of these had never been in the area before and were very impressed with the beautiful rural setting .The outcome was that the invitation to the Christmas events were well and truly over subscribed. In October, Age Concern received a transformation grant “ to create a more co-ordinated approach on activities for older people in the Down area” .Our activities with senior citizen groups were highlighted at a presentation in Downpatrick, and this has led to Glebe House being invited to host a two day festival in June 2010. As a result of a successful bid for Peace 3 Partnership funding, preparation was made for a cross border programme with groups from Ards, Down and Carlingford. This promises to be very exciting with cross border exchanges where people will have opportunities to work with partners from different religious backgrounds and to visit each other in their own localities. As well we have the funding and opportunity to further develop a Skills4All programme extending into Ards as well as Down. The doors are now open for Glebe House to play an important role in extending their work through Ards and Down and into Co Louth.
Angela Fitzpatrick
crafts
christmas art work

CHILDREN & YOUNG PEOPLE’S PROGRAMME
This past year has been very busy. We started by completing the Community Relations reunions from 2008 and through the cold months of January to March, children from Sandy Row, Turf Lodge, Newtownards, Avoniel, Bangor, Antrim and Down returned to Glebe House to work and play together in the positive environment that is Glebe House. We moved onto Easter with a programme consisting of new children from wide and far, as well as our regulars from the Step-thru Teenage group. A great time was had by all, with the weather being particularly kind to us. Time was spent on trips out, Easter egg hunts, Donkey rides, Cinema Nights and all the usual fun at Glebe House. We also hosted a Cross Community group from YouthCom who participated in team building and OCN training and a visit from Rathenraw Community Group who brought some old and new members down for the weekend. May and June was spent preparing for the Summer Programme, and we also welcomed groups from Inverary, Highfield, and the NYP Dublin, who are all now very familiar with Glebe House and enjoy running their own programmes with our support. This summer’s programme was a very positive experience for all in terms of programme, volunteers, community leaders, staff and most of all the children. We welcomed international volunteers from Serbia, Japan, Germany, and Italy and once they had settled in, the Summer Programme started. Groups came from Rathneraw, Downpatrick, Ardglass, Sandy Row, Whiterock, Turf Lodge, Avoniel, Newhill, Westwinds in Newtownards, as well as individuals and family groups from Bangor, Ards, Lisburn and Belfast. We were promised a warm and sunny summer but unfortunately this did materialize. However we carried on with lots of activities and opportunities for the groups, from fishing to donkey rides, walks and trails, arts and crafts, sing-alongs, trips out to Newcastle, Lisburn Leisureplex, a farm, and Castleward. The weeks just flew by. Our international volunteers helped create a truly international summer and the children and community leaders greatly enjoyed the arts, songs, games and cooking from Japan, Serbia, Italy, and Germany. We would like to thank all volunteers and community leaders who worked together to provide the children and young people with an enjoyable and safe holiday. A new venture a week’s Summer Scheme was also a great success, with local children enjoying a great week at Glebe, thanks to the organisation and leadership of Judith O’Neill. Some impressive arts and crafts were produced and proudly taken home. September to December were again busy months with weekend reunions for the summer groups which all went well. We also welcomed the Sandy Row “Lost Boys” for a boy’s weekend and our Spectrum Group down for Halloween and Christmas which were enjoyable weekends for children and volunteers alike. Through the busy schedule of residentials we also made plans for a Peace III programme, meeting community groups and young people from Down North Down and Ards making them aware of this new exciting programme and as we come into the New Year we are well underway developing yet another busy and exciting year for children and young people at Glebe House.
Johnny Watson
pals
making friends at glebe house

CENTRE REPORT

The Glebe House year fits neatly with the seasons of the year. We entered 2009 with renewed energy and the early months of January, February and March saw the extended reunions of the 2008 summer holidays. With Easter falling in mid April, the Stepthrough holiday had the first good weather of the year, adding to that programmes success. We held a special day in May when we renamed the programme unit in memory of Dr Harry Corscadden our past founder and friend. It was a great day with Harry’s family and all of the Glebe House friends. Residentials running up to the start of the summer included the Rainbow Project, Inverary Mother & Toddlers, Highfield Community Centre and the NYP multinational group from Dublin. The summer, was as usual, hectic and once again wet. Volunteering has always been a very important part of Glebe House. From the organisation’s foundation it has been a vital ingredient in the furtherance of the community relations focus for all our programmes. Through constructive volunteering opportunities we have striven to provide meaningful experiences for all. During the summer of 2009, we welcomed our overseas volunteers. Makiko from Japan, Natasa from Serbia, Marieke from Germany, and Elena from Italy were joined by Beda from Switzerland. They participated in the children’s summer programme during July and August, assisting the local volunteers and Glebe House staff in the running of our activities. Our SCI Workcamp with 12 international volunteers recruited through VSI in Dublin ran for 2 weeks in September. We had problems this year in getting some of our volunteers into the UK. Without prior warning or information, the government changed the rules regarding volunteering for non-EU citizens. It is bewildering that someone can come into the UK on a tourist visa and stay for four months with very few questions asked, but a volunteer wanting to come for a 2 week workcamp has to go through a prolonged procedure of applications and interviews. The receiving organisation has to pay a substantial fee for hosting the volunteer with no guarantee of a visa being granted This new bureaucracy affected our summer programme and caused concerns for our international workcamp. It will have implications for future International projects. However all the volunteers once again added that extra special dimension to our programmes. This year we must say an extra thanks to our non-EU volunteers for their patience and tolerance. Glebe House staff try to ensure that the essential ethos of Glebe House is passed on to our visitors. Everyone who comes through our doors is made to feel welcome and special and we aim to make their experience enjoyable, rewarding and unique. We pride ourselves in the human approach, making things understandable and simple, not blinding participants with gobbledegook. We don’t always get it right but we do try to admit our mistakes and rectify them. Over the last year our staff have had to endure the highs and lows of working for a community relations, voluntary organisation, with fragile funding and external tensions. In November we welcomed Marie Hoeretzauer to join Angela Fitzpatrick as programme worker on our Adult programme. Denise Fitzpatrick joined us in January 2010 and is already sharing the Children and Youth programme work with Johnny Watson. We look forward to a strong programme backed up by Debbie and Bernie in the office and supported by Patrick, Emiko, Gerard and Ivor for what looks like a very exciting and demanding year ahead. A big thank you to all those who have helped Glebe House grow over the last year, and helped in so many ways from raising much needed funds to mucking out and gardening.
Diarmaid Mc Garrigle
sumvol09
summer volunteers at kilclief beach

FUNDRAISING AND SPONSORSHIP

Over the last year Harmony Community Trust has been funded and supported by the DE Community Cohesion Unit,, the DHSS&PS Childcare Policy Directorate, The Department of Foreign Affairs, Dublin, Down District Council, The South Eastern and the Belfast HSC Trusts, the BELB CR Scheme, the YCNI, BBC Children in Need, The Irish Youth Foundation, Hendersons Ltd, and the North Down, Ards and Down Peace III Partnership. We thank them all for their support enabling us to develop our cross-community work with children, young people and adults from local community groups. We must also thank local businesses and individuals who helped us with donations and funding for our various fundraising events. We have also been most appreciative of the various gifts and donations which we have received from friends of HCT and Glebe House. It has been heartening to know that there is so much good will directed towards our various activities. Without this support it would be impossible for our work to continue. Our annual Open Day was a great success with many new visitors and blessed by good weather. A new initiative was a Christmas Fair in partnership with the Ballyhornan Mustard Seed Group, and Ardglass Friendship Club. It was a great weekend and we will be repeating the event in 2010. Fundraising is a relentless necessity for the organisation, and with a very busy programme of activities and a small staff team it is hard to maintain the momentum. However we are determined to continue the work to which HCT has been dedicated since 1974, meeting the needs of the Northern Ireland community.
We would welcome support, ideas and volunteers!
hendersons
hendersons management team

HONORARY TREASURERS REPORT
We are pleased to report that the Trust has built upon the progress made last year in re-focussing on widening the sources of income and minimising the running costs giving rise to a surplus on activities for the year. However, Council remain aware of the continuing challenges to come from reductions in core grants and are devoting their efforts to seeking out and further extending the sources of income for future years. Significant inroads have been made in the reduction of bank borrowing. It should be noted that the current market value of the land and buildings is considered to be over £1 million, which is considerably in excess of the carrying value in the balance sheet of £482,660. Fundraising continues to be an important part of the financial imperative for the Trust in continuing the re-capitalisation to provide the strong base for the ongoing development of activities in the coming years.

Summary Statement of Financial Activities Year ended 31 March 2009

Incoming resources 2008
£
2009
£
Generated funds    
Voluntary income 26,986 48,212
Activities for generating funds 6,272 6,461
Charitable activities    
Core grants 104,800 104,331
Programme activities 165,363 145,781
Total incoming resources 303,421 304,785
 
Resources expended    
Cost of generating voluntary income 7,073 7,510
Charitable activities 238,309 220,521
Governance costs 2,616 5,250
 
Total resources expended 247,998 233,281
 
Net incoming resources for year (55,423) 71,504
Funds brought forward 299,825 355,248
Total funds carried forward 355,428 426,752
* includes restricted funds income £23,762 and costs £16,664    
 
Balance Sheet 2008 2009
31 March 2008 £ £
Fixed assets 491,063 496,787
Current assets    
Debtors 44,974 11,465
Cash at bank and in hand 3 6
  44,977 11,471
Creditors falling due within one year (180,792) (81,506)
Net current liabilities (135,815) (70,035)
Net assets 355,248 426,752
 
Reserves    
Unrestricted funds- general funds (113,899) (49,493)
Restricted funds - building and capital grant 469,147 476,245
  355,248 426,752
 

The summary figures for 2008 and 2009 have been extracted from the full audited accounts.


David Boyd
facepaint
open day face painting

PEACE III PROGRAMMES 2010

There are three programmes:
The Concordia and Down-Louth Children and Youth programme;
The Skills4All and ACE Adult programme
and the Carlingford Link Cross border programme,
funded by the North Down, Ards and Down Peace III Partnership.
They will involve partnerships with community and youth groups in the 3 Council areas, and also include a cross border element with Carlingford Community Development in Co Louth.
The programmes are for Anyone in the North Down, Ards and Down District areas who would like to participate in a variety of cross-community and cross-border projects. People involved in their local community who would like help and support to organise their own cross- community activities for adults and young people. Enthusiasm and a willingness to learn are more important than experience or skills. Our programmes are informal and will help gain confidence, necessary knowledge and new skills. There are separate programmes for children, young people and adults of all ages.
The Children and Youth Project will consist of: Residential weekends and midweeks at Glebe House; exchange of views and a sense of our shared and differing history and cultural heritage; the building of relationships between community groups; training for local youth leaders in good community relations with young people and Involvement in the Carlingford Link. We are also hoping to develop a programme of cross-community and cross-border exchanges between young people in Down and Louth.

The Carlingford Link Project will provide opportunities to explore the shared and different history and culture linking the Carlingford and Strangford Lough areas. It involves short breaks at Glebe House, and in Carlingford, with visits, talks and discussions and Study tours.

The Skills4All Project together with the ACE Project is aimed at giving people involved in local community groups and interested individuals, the opportunity to participate in cross-community activities within the Ards, Down and North Down Area including: Workshops with a community relations focus based on expressed needs and interests, of use to local groups; Social gatherings & Study tours. Through learning about the local community, and networking with people from different backgrounds and cultures, participants will experience the value of positive community relations and working together on a variety of projects.
sumvol091
makiko and natasa

THE TEENAGE PROGRAMME:
This programme of cross-community weekends with a focus on citizenship is funded by the YCNI.

THE SPECTRUM AND STEPTHROUGH PROGRAMMES:
These residential programmes running through the year and funded by the Belfast HSC Trust Disability Team will involve disabled children and young people and their siblings.

OTHER ACTIVITIES:
Residential Community Relations Programmes for Children and Young people from disadvantaged communities

Self programming groups supported by Glebe House staff with CR and Team Building activities for youth clubs, schools, community groups, disability and other generic groups

Adult Programmes and Volunteering, including study seminars and workcamps, opportunities for volunteering, learning workshops on a variety of subjects, work-study programmes and International study tours

Fund Raising events:
Open day in June and Christmas Fair as well as other initiatives

Glebe House is supported by
sponsors



annual report 2008

cover

Chairpersons Report
It has been an encouraging year although we encountered considerable uncertainty over core funding in March and April which necessitated staff changes and a late start for the annual cycle of community relations programmes. We were hit by a double whammy as the Belfast Health and Social Care Trust changed their policy of supporting respite opportunities for individual children in need or “at risk”. This decision meant that over 60 children lost the opportunity of a holiday or weekend at Glebe House. As these children are some of the most socially excluded members of the community, at risk of being caught up in anti-social and sectarian behaviour, they particularly benefit from being involved in our programmes. Luckily the Disability Team of the Belfast Trust and the Family and Child Care Team of the South Eastern HSC Trust continued to participate in our programmes.
We have continued to develop programmes to meet the changing needs of the community as well as the aims and objectives of Harmony Community Trust. We have been pleased to see the increasing use of Glebe House by groups from the Down District. This has been the result of the NewSkills4All Project funded by the Down District LSP as well as grants from Down District Council and Awards for All. The projects have varied from Computer and Digital Imaging classes, the Mural project, training sessions and Senior Citizen days to children’s residentials. Despite the fact that the LSP funding ceased in June, we hope to see a continued use of our facilities by local groups. The refurbishment and extra resources we now have, thanks to an additional grant from the Community Relations Council, means that Glebe House can facilitate various different groups for workshops and conferences as well as residentials. We hope more organisations throughout Ireland will benefit from our facilities in the future.
We have provided 6,190 child/person days to 3,070 disadvantaged children, young people and adults. There have been 54 different groups making use of our facilities and volunteers from 12 different countries.
I thank my fellow committee members for their hard work which ensures the continued success of Harmony Community Trust. I must also thank the staff and volunteers, who have developed and maintained the facilities and run the programmes.
We are looking forward with optimism to the future. It is a time of change and optimism in Northern Ireland but we know through the demand for our services and the ideas incorporated into our Development Plan that there is still an important role for Harmony Community Trust to play in developing a shared future in Ireland.

Helen Honeyman

Programme Report
It is hard to believe that 2008 has been and gone! On the Glebe House Programme front, it felt like the year passed in a flash! We welcomed back many “old regulars” and introduced new groups to the “Glebe House Experience”
The young people who participate in our programmes work together on an evolving series of activities which focus on developing an awareness of similar and different cultures, attitudes and beliefs, thus promoting good relations and a sense of a shared future. Our community relations programme, which twins community groups sees many friendships formed. Those involved learn about their own community and that of others. They gain the confidence to have fun together while, at the same time, enjoying new and positive experiences. Groups participating in the programme this year included: Avoniel, Bridge, Sandy Row, Markets, Duncairn, SVP Turf Lodge and Inverary from Belfast; West Winds from Newtownards, Vincent’s from Downpatrick and Rathenraw from Antrim. Each group also had individual young people referred through Social Services. We also saw groups such as Marrowbone and NYP Dublin, running their own residential programmes with the support of Glebe House staff. If anything, Summer 2008 proved to be even wetter than 2007 but it did not deter our efforts! All those who participated on the programmes had memorable and fun experiences.
Easter saw two residentials, one for the 7-12 age group and one for the Stepthrough Group for learning disabled teenagers. After this we were into a series of weekends and midweek’s for groups from Highfield, Inverary, Rathenraw, The Bridge, Downpatrick, West Winds PS and the Neighbourhood Youth Project, Dublin as well as our own the pre- summer preparations.
Autumn saw a busy series of weekends such as one with the Rainbow Project and another with Marrowbone CC from North Belfast. Unfortunately groups from Ascert, NICCY and NICHS cancelled at the last minute due to dropouts and lack of leaders. This year we gave all our Summer groups two re-union weekends with Autumn and Winter themes alongside activities based on exploration of history and identity, rather than a series of evening activities. This change of format has proved popular with the groups. Christmas saw children from Tullycarnet Family Project, SVP, Rathenraw and Social Services enjoying two weekends of Christmas fun and games.
The NewSkills4All programme went from strength to strength during its final year. The programme has provided training and information on a range of topics from computer skills to leather work to child protection and fundraising, at Glebe House and other venues.
Finally, we must thank all the children, young people, community groups, volunteers and staff who have contributed to making the year a success. More than ever, during these times of “credit crunch” and economic gloom, our future achievements will be at the mercy of funding restraints. We realise the year ahead will be difficult, but we look forward to the challenges that 2009 will bring.

Sharon Heaney Programme Committee Chair

Future Plans

• Developing our agreements with Social Services Trusts.
• Programmes for disabled young people on volunteering and active life styles.
• Promoting the inclusion of ethnic and national minorities in our community.
• Inviting a variety of local groups to use our facilities.
• Recruiting, and supporting more volunteers.
• Developing cross-border programmes and initiatives.
• Marketing Glebe House to a wide variety of groups.
• Developing the natural habitat at Glebe House for environmental projects.
• Continuing to build on our fundraising strategy and income generation.

Glebe House Centre Report

diarpens
This year has seen new developments, new staff and new groups using Glebe House despite the usual spectre of financial gloom. Luckily the gloom was not as bad as predicted and the positive approach of our staff and committees in maintaining the programmes and the increased usage of the centre helped us brave the storm.
Some new ideas for programmes were brought forward, thanks to Beverly, Fiona and Johnny our programme staff. We ran Mural Painting weekends in January and this was built into the Summer programme with each group completing a piece of a new Mural in the Barn.
We have run a busy and hectic residential and day programme of activities during the last year which is mentioned in the programme report, but I would like to thank some of the unsung hero’s of Glebe House, without whom the place would grind to a halt.
Emiko is from Japan and has been our cleaner for the last year, she is a breath of Spring and a joy to work with. She brings the jasmine fragrance of her country to this little piece of Co Down.
Ivor has been involved with Glebe House for many years, at present he volunteers with driving and other maintenance work, getting on with things, he brings a common sense approach to the centre.
Patrick our Cook is responsible for all of the food provided to visitors. He works away in our windowless kitchen, satisfying the various dietary needs. In between meals Patrick is glued to a computer sourcing information for programmes, equipment and even livestock.
During the year we welcomed new groups from far and near on differing programmes. From January to the start of the summer the New Horzions group came each week to work on the sensory garden. At Easter we hosted a reconciliation group from Haiti. This group was organised by Ian White a past volunteer and ex director of Glencree. The group brought a touch of the Caribbean to Kilclief and took away with them a better understanding of Northern Ireland. In April and May we linked up with local youth groups from the Down area and saw the Girls Brigade and the Midnight Club make use of our facilities. Later in the year we were joined by our friends from the NYP in Dublin, who brought a young foreign national group in October, who studiously worked all week on anti drugs posters. Another new group to mention was the Rainbow Project who enjoyed a sunny autumn weekend in October.
Staff:
Johnny Watson joined the staff team in July and with only a few weeks induction was up to his neck in the summer programme, ably assisted by Fiona Stephens. Debbie Sharvin and Bernie Armstrong were taken on as parttime admin staff in June, after temping during Sinead Shields maternity leave. Sinead finished working with us in June. Gerard McWilliams from Belfast and Alina from St Petersburg worked as a volunteer for the two months of the summer. A special mention must go to Alina who after spending 2 months getting to grips with Northern Irish English and excelling in childcare, left us in September to get married.
Angela Fitzpatrick has continued in her role as New Skills 4 All programme worker. Over the last 2 years Angela as developed and nurtured this project enabling local people to become active citizens in the community. From June when the Peace II funding from the LSP ceased, Angela extended her role to the wider community with the post being funded by the Children’s Fund.
Volunteers:
Volunteers as always are an essential ingredient in every aspect of our work. Over the last number of years volunteers seem to have become an endangered species and we are struggling to find them. This year we were grateful to the community group leaders and volunteers as well as our own volunteers including, Lauren, Zara, Cheryl, Marie Therese, Dominic, Frannie, Louis, Gerard McCloskey, Gerard McW who assisted in the summer, on the reunion weekends and on other project work during the year. We should also thank the many volunteers who assisted with Open Day
Our annual International Workcamp took place in September, with a great group of volunteers from 8 countries. We also welcomed Miguel, Martin, Ellinor and Stefano who had been volunteers in 1998 for their tenth anniversary reunion. A big thank you to all our volunteers.
With slippage funding award in July 08, from CRC Measure 2.1, we were able to complete some outstanding refurbishment which included, replacing old beds and mattresses, providing bedroom cupboards, providing crockery place settings and conference chairs, tables and data projector for the Orchard building. We were also able to provide window blinds in the Orchard building and our other training rooms, replace bedding and towels, increase the number of washing and drying machines and vacuum cleaners, plus other sundry items. We would like to thank CRC for their help during this work.
Finally I would like thank everyone who has helped Glebe House continue in its much-needed role in our society.

Diarmaid McGarrigle Centre Manager

In Memoriam Dr Harry Corscadden

harry

Harry Corscadden, one of the founders, past Chairman and President, and a constant friend, of Harmony Community Trust sadly died aged a magnificent 101 in 2008. Harry was the inspiration and guiding light in the early years of the Trust, demonstrating a faith and commitment to the cause of Peace and Reconciliation throughout the difficult early years of “The Troubles”, when the practical promotion of community relations was fraught with difficulties.
Harry’s experience as the Chief Executive of the Ulster Bank and a committed Rotarian was of immense value in enabling Glebe House to expand and develop its work whilst ensured sound management principles which have stood us in good stead over the years. We will miss him for his constant friendship, interest and support. His contribution to peace in Northern Ireland has been unsung, due to his innate modesty, but there are thousands of children and young people from areas of deprivation and sectarianism who have benefited from his commitment to Glebe House We are pleased that he managed a last visit to Kilclief in September and was able to witness the continuing value of his vision.

Funding and Sponsorship

We must thank the DHSS&PS Childcare Policy Directorate, whose funding has continued during the year. We were delighted that the Department of Education Community Relations grant was extended at the eleventh hour until March 2009 which allowed us to appoint a second programme worker in June and the last minute extension for a year of the Children’s Fund grant enabled us to continue our programme of respite opportunities for socially excluded children and young people. We are disappointed that this Executive Fund which has provided services for so many disadvantaged children is being discontinued with no replacement funding sources. We must also thank our other funders, BBC Children in Need, the Community Relations Council Peace II extension, Down District Partnership Board, Awards for All, Down District Council, EHSSB Health and Social Services Trusts, BELB, Inner Wheel Clubs of Ireland and Gt Britain, The Rotary Club of Belfast, the Irish Youth Foundation and many independent donors.
Yet again we are entering a new year in a position of uncertainty with regard to major statutory funding which makes long term budgeting very difficult. We are increasingly dependent on the contributions from participants on our programmes and sponsoring community groups or agencies and we see this as the way forward to ensure the sustainability of Glebe House and its facilities. However as a major proportion of our participants come from situations of social and economic disadvantage and the funding crisis is affecting everyone, we are faced with a big challenge to attain sustainability. We are determined that we will find the necessary resources to continue the work to which HCT has been dedicated for the past 34 years, to meet the current needs of the Northern Ireland community.
Local businesses and individuals in Strangford, Downpatrick and Belfast have continued to help us with our fundraising, and in particular their support of our annual Open Day or family fun event. This year we were blessed with good weather and tremendous crowds for this Family Fun Day. Unfortunately the summer holiday programme was not so lucky but despite grey skies and rain a good time was had by all. As always we are most appreciative of the various gifts and donations which we have received from friends, past volunteers and staff and many other contacts. It has been heartening to know that there is so much good will directed towards our activities. Without this support it would be impossible for the work to continue. Fundraising is a relentless necessity for the organisation, and it is an increasingly stressful occupation, with massive competition for scarce funds. We would welcome volunteers to help with the various aspects of fundraising.

Honorary Treasurer’s Report

We are pleased to report that the Trust has worked hard on consolidating the progress made last year on the strategic plan adopted the previous year, and is pleased with the increased programme income and reduction in running costs giving rise to a surplus on activities for the year.
However, Council are well aware of the challenges to come from reductions on core grants in 2009 and devoting their efforts to seeking out and extending the sources of income for future years.
It should be noted that the current market value of the land and buildings is approximately £1.5 million, which is considerably in excess of the carrying value in the balance sheet of £482,660. Fundraising continues to be an important part of the financial imperative for the Trust in providing for the re-capitalisation to provide the strong base for the ongoing development of activities in the coming years.

David Boyd

Summary Statement of Financial Activities Year ended 31 March 2008

Incoming resources 2008 2008
£
2007
£
Generated funds    
Voluntary income 26,986 23,186
Activities for generating funds 6,272 8,835
Charitable activities    
Core grants 104,800 91,833
Programme activities 165,363 135,047
Total incoming resources 303,421 258,901
 
Resources expended    
Cost of generating voluntary income 7,073 8,670
Charitable activities 238,309 237,062
Governance costs 2,616 3,750
 
Total resources expended 247,998 249,482
 
Net outgoing (incoming) resources for year (55,423) 9,419
Funds brought forward 299,825 290,406
Total funds carried forward 355,428 299,825
* includes restricted funds income £nil and costs £14,008    
 
Balance Sheet 2008 2007
31 March 2007 £ £
Fixed assets 491,063 488,357
Current assets    
Debtors 44,974 20,605
Cash at bank and in hand 3 12
  44,977 20,617
Creditors falling due within one year (180,792) (209,149)
Net current liabilities (135,815) (188,532)
Net assets 355,248 299,825
 
Reserves    
Unrestricted funds- general funds (113,899) (163,285)
Restricted funds - building and capital grant 469,147 463,110
  355,248 299,825
 

The summary figures for 2008 and 2007 have been extracted from the full audited accounts.




annual report 2007
annreportcov
Chairpersons Report
2007 has been an encouraging year despite the ongoing financial constraints and changes in the staff team. The variety and the quality of the activities as well as the number of people involved in activities have grown over the year.
We have provided 6,304 child/person days to 3,413 disadvantaged children, young people and adults. There have been 48 different groups making use of our facilities and volunteers from 14 different countries.
We have continued to develop programmes which meet both the needs of local communities as well as the aims and objectives of Harmony Community Trust. We have particularly welcomed the chance to offer more respite opportunities to individual children in need and “at risk”. They are some of the most socially excluded members of the community, at risk of being caught up in anti-social and sectarian behaviour. We feel they benefit from being involved in our programmes, which actively promote positive community relations and being part of a group residential experience. This respite programme has been possible through the support of the Children’s Fund and the EHSSB Trusts.
The modernisation of the kitchen area and washing facilities in the old house means that we now have a residential facility to suit various different groups as well as facilities for workshops and conferences that we hope other organisations will be able to use and benefit from.
I should like to thank my fellow committee members for their hard work and freely shared expertise which ensures the continued success of Harmony Community Trust. I must also thank the staff and volunteers, without whom it would not have been possible to maintain the facilities and run the programmes.
We are looking forward with optimism to the future. It is a time of change and optimism in Northern Ireland but we know through the demand for our services and the ideas incorporated into our future plan that there is still an important role for Harmony Community Trust to play in developing a truly shared future for everyone.
Helen Honeyman

Core Programme Report
2007 proved a very busy year on the Programme front and it flew by with alarming speed for both new users and our “old hands” who return year after year.
Our community relations programme involves the “twinning” of two community groups from across the sectarian divide. The children and young people who take part work together on an evolving series of activities which focus on developing an awareness of similar and different cultures, beliefs and attitudes, thus promoting good relations and a sense of a shared future. Those taking part develop new friendships, learn about their own and other communities, thus enhancing their confidence to have fun while, at the same time, enjoying new and positive experiences. Groups participating in the programme this year included: Avoniel, Bridge, and Duncairn from Belfast; West Winds from Newtownards, Rathenraw from Antrim, Vincent’s from Downpatrick and two groups from Larne. Each group also had individual children and young people referred through social services and other agencies.
It was exciting to see some groups having gained enough confidence and experience over the years take the step of running their own residential programme with the support and guidance of Glebe House staff.
In March a group of children from Newtownards designed and built a float which took part in the St Patrick’s Day Parade in Downpatrick. Great teamwork and enthusiasm resulted in a most impressive display!
There followed two residentials over the Easter holidays, one for children aged 7- 12 and a Stepthrough group for learning disabled teenagers. Then we were into the very hectic pre-holiday preparations for the Summer Holidays! 2007 may not have been the hottest or driest on record but all those who took part on the programmes had a fun-filled and memorable time at Glebe House! Besides the focussed community relations activities included arts and crafts, nature trails, swimming, donkey rides and visits to Newcastle, Tollymore and Delamont. Autumn saw a busy programme of Follow-Up activities and reunion weekends. There were fun activities such as swimming, visits to fire stations and crafts as well as discussion sessions and activities with the more serious themes of cultural difference/similarity and conflict resolution. There were two seasonal themed residentials over the Christmas period. Participants were individually referred by social services. The programme ended with an International Day in February at the Ice Bowl. The Stepthrough programme for learning disabled teenagers has continued to run during the year. It is focussed on developing independent and healthy lifestyles. We hope to extend the project in 2008. Finally our NewSkills4All programme providing training and support for local community people has gone from strength to strength during 2007. Some of its activities are outlined in the Centre Manager’s report. We must thank the children, young people community groups and volunteers who helped make the year a success .As always, our future programmes are at the mercy of funding restraints but we look forward positively to the challenge of 2008.
Sharon Heaney Programme Committee

Fundraising Events
Open Day in June was blighted by solid rain from dawn to dusk, but amazingly, we welcomed many stalwart supporters who managed to have a fun day as well as contribute to our general fundraising. Our annual Art Exhibition was postponed until February as we were unable to get an autumn booking in Downpatrick Library. In advance we once again thank the artists who are supporting us, and the volunteers manning the exhibition, as well as Margaret Ritchie MLA for opening the event. Fundraising is a relentless necessity for the organisation, and it is an increasingly stressful occupation, with massive competition for scarce funds. With a very busy programme of activities year round, and a reduced staff team it is hard to find the people to take on the heavy burden of writing funding applications, let alone organise fundraising events. However, we are determined that we will find the necessary resources to continue the work to which HCT has been dedicated for the past 34 years and to develop our programmes to meet the current needs of the Northern Ireland community. We would welcome support, ideas and volunteers! As those who are involved know, it is good fun as well as hard work!
Helen Honeyman

Glebe House Centre Report
2007 at Glebe House will be remembered as a year of new developments, renovations, a near funding crisis and a fun filled summer children’s programme of constant rain.
Sensory Garden
The year began with an exciting new project with a new partner, Harmony Senses. This group was made up of disabled adults on a programme with the East Down Collage of further education. The group assisted by Janette Bradshaw, formed themselves into Harmony Senses and began designing and fundraising for a Sensory Garden at Glebe House. They managed to recruit or rope in volunteers from Down District Council, The Horticulture Department from East Down Collage and other local groups. Work on the garden began in early January and after a lot of hard work and effort the Garden was officially opened in June.
CRC Capital Grant
In March we were finally able to commence the work funded by the CRC through measure 2:1 of European Peace 2 funding, applied for back in 2005. The project was to up grade existing facilities in the Glebe and the Cottage. Work in the Cottage included replacement windows and doors. In the Glebe we completely refurbished the Main kitchen, and dishwashing area. We put in new cupboards, sink and worktop into the dinning room. We also up graded the toilets and wash areas and created a new shower room and toilet upstairs. This work took place during our busy summer period, but thanks to Fergie Fitzsimons our main contractor and his team, the work went ahead with out any major disruption to our programmes. We would like to thank Gordon Millington who supervised the technical side of the project and CRC for their financial support. The new facilities have greatly improved both the catering and residential usage at the Centre.
New Skills 4 All
With Angela Fitzpatrick firmly at the helm, this active citizenship project has developed and grown since its introduction in November 2006. Angela has worked with groups from a wide area in Down District providing information and training on a range of social need topics and has facilitated a number of workshops and events at Glebe House and other venues. The Computer courses aimed at older people have really taken off. We are offering basic computer skills for beginners in a very relaxed and user-friendly setting. Over the year we ran four 6-week courses that were well attended, even in the worst of the winter weather. Angela has organised child protection training courses, arts & crafts and music and dance programmes as well as working closely with local groups on their own projects where thanks to funding from the Down Local Strategy Partnership, Angela has been able to assist with small grant funding. This project has immense benefits for people in the local area who can feel isolated and unattached from the needs of their community and restricts their own personal development, it also opens Glebe House up to a new client group who can make use of our resources.
Visiting Groups
Over the last year we have ran over eighty, day, evening and residential activities at Glebe House. The groups have come from all over Northern Ireland and from Dublin. The programmes have been aimed at Children, Teenagers and Adults, with a variety of abilities and other needs. The activities like the groups have covered a wide range of topic’s and subjects, from focused Community Relations work to Gardening and Interpersonal / group Team Building and Dancing. We also hosted two International Workcamps and 8 International summer volunteers coming from as far away as Japan, Turkey and Slovakia as well as nearly every country in Western Europe. Every weekend between January and June, and September to December saw a multitude of organisations availing of our resources’. Over the summer, July and August we welcomed, Community groups, Social Service Trusts and other organisations, who took part in our one week programmes, which this year included continual rain drenched activities. BBQ’s, beach walks and Donkey rides in the rain was the order of the summer. Somewhere in there we found room for a Down Community Arts summer scheme and visitors in the Cottage.
International Workcamp
Our International Workcamp in September, organised last year by VSI in Dublin, finally saw the rains stop, as we hosted a fantastic group of international volunteers. They stayed for two weeks and put Glebe House back together after the busy summer programme. The group carried out environmental work around the Centre and took part in discussion workshops on a variety of issues relating to Irish politics and history. We would like to thank all the volunteers and the staff of VSI for one of our most successful workcamps.
Summer Volunteers
This year we also welcomed summer volunteers from Switzerland, Czech Rep, Slovakia, USA, Germany and England, a great group of individuals who worked tirelessly through the summer and added that special International flavour to our activities, a big thank you to one and all.
Given that we started and finished the year with a reduction in staffing levels and that we have had severe problems recruiting local volunteers to work with children, we have managed to run one of the busiest programmes in a good few years. We would like to thank all those who helped make 2007 a great one and we look forward to what the coming year will bring. We thank our neighbours in Kilclief and Strangford for their support and tolerance. Finally I would like to thank the Glebe House staff and volunteer team for their hard work and flexibility in coping with builders, demanding programmes, making do and mending, and the joys of working with mulitudes of children even in the rain.
Diarmaid McGarrigle Centre Manager

Funding and Sponsorship
The year started with the shock of learning that our application for funding for 2007-2010 from the Department of Education had been turned down. The shock was all the greater because we had been funded by the Department for 32 of our 33 years work in the field of community relations. Fortunately in April our appeal was successful and funding was agreed for 2007-2008. Unfortunately in the interim we had to make 4 staff posts, redundant and then recruit for a new Programme Coordinator post in May. We would like to thank the Department of Education for their renewed funding. We must also thank the DHSS&PS Childcare Policy Directorate, who adjusted the allocation of their grant to take into account our changed situation. Thanks as well to our other funders, the Children’s Fund, BBC Children in Need, the Community Relations Council Peace II extension, Down District Peace Partnership, Down District Council, EHSSB Health and Social Services Trusts, BELB, Inner Wheel Clubs of Ireland and Gt Britain, The Rotary Club of Belfast, the Irish Youth Foundation and many independent donors. We are grateful for their support enabling us to develop our cross-community work with disadvantaged young people and adults. We enter 2008 in a position of uncertainty with regard to major statutory funding. The Children’s Fund is due to finish in March and the Peace II Extension grant from Down Peace Partnership ends in June. Additionally, we have not yet heard whether the DE will fund us post March. All these factors make long term programme budgeting very difficult. We are increasingly dependent on the contributions from participants on our programmes and sponsoring community groups or other agencies and we see this as the way forward to ensure the sustainability of Glebe House and its facilities. However as a major proportion of our children and young people are referred by Social Services, the uncertainty surrounding the re-organisation of the Health and Social Services Trusts is delaying our negotiations for placements for the coming year. Local businesses and individuals in Strangford, Downpatrick and Belfast have continued to help us with donations for our various fundraising events. As always we are most appreciative of the various gifts and donations which we have received from friends, past volunteers and staff and many other contacts. It has been heartening to know that there is so much good will directed towards our activities. Without this support it would be impossible for the work to continue. Fundraising continues to be an important part of the financial imperative for the Trust in providing for the re-capitalisation to provide the strong base for the ongoing development of activities in the coming years

Future Plans
As well as continuing our ongoing good relations programmes with children and young people in 2008, we are looking forward to the development of successful projects started in 2007 and several new initiatives:

Extending the Children’s Respite Project to include new groups of marginalised children
Developing our agreements with Social Services
Continuing the New Skills 4 All project for adults
Programmes focusing on promoting good relations
Developing programmes for both disabled and non-disabled young people with an emphasis on volunteering and active life styles
Promoting the inclusion of the ethnic and national minorities in our community
Recruiting, and supporting more volunteers
Marketing Glebe House encouraging the use of the facilities by self-programming groups
Developing the natural habitat at Glebe House for environmental and educational projects.

Honorary Treasurer’s Report
We are pleased to report that the strategic plan adopted last year has impacted in the results for this year, with the increased programme income and reduction in running costs giving rise to a surplus on activities for the year. Council are devoting their efforts to further improving this situation in 2008. It should be noted that the current market value of the land and buildings is considered to be approximately £1.5 million, which is considerably in excess of the carrying value in the balance sheet of £482,660.
David Boyd Treasurer

Summary Statement of Financial Activities Year ended 31 March 2007

Incoming resources 2007 2006
£
2007
£
Generated funds    
Voluntary income *40,889 23,186
Activities for generating funds 9,687 8,835
Charitable activities    
Core grants 94,889 91,833
Programme activities 112,892 135,047
Total incoming resources 258,357 258,901
 
Resources expended    
Cost of generating voluntary income 8,102 8,670
Charitable activities *254,808 237,062
Governance costs 3,759 3,750
 
Total resources expended 266,669 249,482
 
Net outgoing (incoming) resources for year (8,312) 9,419
Funds brought forward 298,718 290,406
Total funds carried forward 290,406 299,825
* includes restricted funds income £nil and costs £14,008    
 
Balance Sheet 2006 2007
31 March 2007 £ £
Fixed assets 495,672 488,357
Current assets    
Debtors 23,194 20,605
Cash at bank and in hand 202 12
  23,396 20,617
Creditors falling due within one year (228,662) (209,149)
Net current liabilities (205,266) (188,532)
Net assets 290,406 299,825
 
Reserves    
Unrestricted funds- general funds (186,712) (163,285)
Restricted funds - building and capital grant 477,118 463,110
  290,406 299,825
 

The summary figures for 2007 and 2006 have been extracted from the full audited accounts.



Annual Report 2006

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Chairpersons Report

2006 has been encouraging year in the development of Harmony Community Trust despite the ongoing financial constraints and changes in the staff team. The variety of projects and the quality of the activities as well as the number of children and young people involved in activities has grown over the year. We have provided 5,710 child/person days to 2,916 disadvantaged children, young people and adults. There have been 49 different groups making use of our facilities and volunteers from 12 different countries. We have continued to develop programmes which meet both the needs of local communities as well as the aims and objectives of Harmony Community Trust. We have been particularly pleased with the increasing numbers of children and young people referred by social services for our various programmes. These are some of the most socially excluded members of the community, who are most at risk of being caught up in anti-social and sectarian behaviour. We feel they benefit from being involved in our cross-community programmes, which actively promote positive community relations. They also benefit from being part of a group experience, making new friends, enjoying new experiences and developing self-confidence and self-esteem. We have also been pleased to see that our Children's Fund Respite programme finally operated to its full potential. We are delighted that we can continue this initiative through to March 2008, enabling more socially excluded children to benefit from the Glebe House experience.

New initiatives this year have included a Teenage Active Citizenship programme; digital imaging classes for local adults; two summer playschemes with Down Community Arts and the start of our NewSkills4All training programme for community activists and volunteers in Down District. We have also seen the installation of a reed bed to deal with our water waste in an environmentally sustainable way and the Sensory Garden developed on the front lawn by horticultural students from the East Down Institute. After 20 years we fleft our Belfast premises in Great Victoria Street. The changing environment in which we are working allows us do non-residential activities in the Belfast area using community facilities. Equally, electronic communication means that these activities can be organised from a Strangford base. We now have a pied- a- terre on the Cliftonville Road. A sad event during the year was the death of Barney Filor, a founder member of Harmony Community Trust, long serving Council member and loyal supporter of Glebe House. His work and commitment to peace and reconciliation was much appreciated by us all. I should like to thank my fellow committee members for their hard work and freely shared expertise which ensures the continued success of Harmony Community Trust. I must also thank the staff and volunteers, without whom it would not have been possible to implement the necessary changes to our operation, let alone run the programmes.

We are looking forward with optimism to the future. The demand for Glebe House and ideas that have been incorporated into our future plan are indications that there is still an important role for Harmony Community Trust to play in the life of Northern Ireland.

The Community Relations Programmes

The year has flown past with a busy year of "Glebe House experiences" for new groups alongside those who return year after year. Our community relations programme involves twinning two community groups from across the sectarian divide to work together for a year on an evolving series of activities focussing on developing an awareness of similar and different cultures, attitudes and beliefs, thus promoting good relations and the concept of a shared future. The children develop new friendships, learn about their own and other communities, thus enhancing their confidence to have fun whilst enjoying new experiences. Groups participating in the programme this year included: Trinity Street, Moyard, Bridge, Newington Marrowbone and Avoniel, from Belfast, from Belfast; Westwinds from Newtownards; Rathenraw and Greystones from Antrim, and Antiville from Larne. Each group also had individual children and young people referred by social services and other agencies.

There were two residentials over the Easter holidays, one for 8 to 12 year olds and Stepthrough for learning disabled teenagers. We then moved into the pre-holiday preparation for the summer holidays. Despite the projected dire effects of global warming, the fantastic weather this summer, with all the joys of sun and sea, added to the success of the 8 summer programmes. Activities besides the focussed community relations and team building exercises included arts and crafts, swimming, donkey rides, swimming and the delights of Tollymore and Newcastle.

A busy autumn programme of follow-up activities and reunion weekends for all the groups, culminated in pantomime trips to the Waterfront Hall. Activities included participating in Halloween activities in Downpatrick and Delamont, ice-skating, swimming and crafts as well as discussions and activities with more serious themes such as conflict and cultural differences and similarities. A new initiative that we started this autumn, and one we want to continue was our Teenage Active Citizenship project. We must thank the children, young people, community groups and volunteers who helped make the year one that can be remembered for so many good reasons. We are looking forward to moving onwards and upwards in 2007.

Centre Managers Report 2006

The 31st Year in the continuing saga of Glebe House began on the first weekend of January 2006. A typically cold, wet, winter weekend in Co Down. Then the children arrived and the flurry of sorting out and making beds, playing games, having donkey rides, doing arts and crafts and having loads of good fun joining in community relations at Glebe House had started for another year. A year at Glebe House is a year of hellos and goodbyes. A year of making friends, discovering new things and learning how to live together. It's a year of exploring new ideas, taking the plunge and trying to be ready for the unexpected. Our programmes are aimed mostly at children, and the vast majority of them are trying something new for the first time, at an age when days are long and you have all the time in the world.

We try to give these children and the others who come to Glebe House the freedom to be themselves in positive explorations, where they can learn about themselves and others without the interference that the present day world throws at them. This past year has seen changes in the staff team at Glebe House. Ann Carson started in February, working on the Children's Fund programme, aimed at disadvantaged young people from South and East Belfast and surrounding areas. Anna Johnston started in June, as a programme worker at Glebe House, working on the community relations and other programmes. Fiona Stephens came in July as a volunteer, and then took over the second programme worker post, working at Glebe House but also helping to run the follow up programmes in Belfast. Finally, Michelle McCabe joined us for 2 months over the summer before going on to Social Work at university. With a new programme team in place we went into a very busy summer programme which included ten 1 week residential programmes and two 1 week summer schemes, followed by an international workcamp and very hectic autumn follow up and reunion programme to the end of December. In late October the staff team welcomed Angela Fitzpatrick, to work on the New Skills 4 All programme, delivering an Active Citizenship training programme in Down District. Keeping all heads above water and with an eagle eye on the bank statements is Sinead Fitzsimons, who dashed off round the world in November and returned in December, with a great tan, as Mrs Shields. Mary Kirk ably assists Sinead in the Glebe House office. A big thanks to all the staff for their hard work and enthusiasm over the last year.

Being a residential facility, the Glebe House Centre continually needs running repairs, upgrades and facelifts from time to time. So we are constantly looking at our needs and most importantly where we can source the funding to carry out this work. Over the year we have drawn up plans for refurbishment in the old house, which will commence in 2007. Over the last few years we have been looking at the environmental impact of Glebe House and our responsibility for the little area of Co Down that we inhabit. For long time we have had a green policy in our approach to the running of Glebe House. At the end of the year, we had our Reed Bed system installed. This is part of a natural waste digesting system that is connected to our septic tank and prevents polluted wastewater from going into the river course behind Glebe House. We now feel we want to go further and hope to draw up plans to address environmental issues over the coming years.

2006 was a year of changes in many ways and has given us the opportunity to look at where Glebe House is heading . We have yet to find the final answer to this, but are looking in the right direction. We thank all our volunteers and friends for their continued support.
Diarmaid McGarrigle Centre Manager

Fundraising and Sponsorship

Harmony Community Trust has been funded and supported during the year by the Department of Education Community Relations Division, DHSS&PS Childcare Policy Directorate, The Children's Fund, BBC Children in Need, OFM&DFM Community Relations Unit, the Community Relations Council Peace II extension, Down District Partnership Board, Down District Council, the Landfill Tax, Credit Scheme, EHSSB Health and Social Services Trusts, BELB, Inner Wheel Clubs of Ireland and Gt Britain, The Rotary Club of Belfast, the Irish Youth Foundation and many independent donors.. We thank them all for their support enabling us to develop our cross-community work with disadvantaged young people.

We are increasingly dependent on the contributions from participants on our programmes and sponsoring community groups or other agencies and we see this as the way forward to ensure the sustainability of Glebe House and its facilities. Local businesses and individuals in Strangford, Downpatrick and Belfast have continued to help us with donations and funding for our various fundraising events. As always we are most appreciative of the various gifts and donations which we have received from friends, past volunteers and staff and many other contacts. It has been heartening to know that there is so much good will directed towards our activities. Without this support it would be impossible for the work to continue.

Open Day in June was bigger and better than usual with new attractions and good weather contributing to the enjoyment and success of the day. We ran another Art Exhibition in Downpatrick Library in early December, and must once again thank the artists who supported us with their paintings, the library for their help and the volunteers who manned the exhibition, as well as the people who bought paintings.

Fundraising is a relentless necessity for the organisation, and it is an increasingly stressful occupation as there is massive competition for scarce funds. With a very busy programme of activities year round, it is hard to find volunteers for all events. We will be trying to increase our fundraising in 2007 to make up for decreases in statutory funding and will welcome support, ideas and volunteers! As those who are involved know, it is good fun as well as hard work
Honorary Treasurer's Report

The Trust has adopted the new Statement of Recommended Practice: Accounting and Reporting by Charities and comparative figures have been restated. The year has benefited from the changes made in 2005, with the reduction in costs almost resulting in breakeven for 2006. This will flow through to the present year which is currently operating at a surplus. The new Orchard Building was completed and opened in the year and has been in constant demand for indoor programming activity and outside group use.

Fundraising continues to be an important part of the financial imperative for the Trust in providing for the re-capitalisation to provide the strong base for the ongoing development of activities in the coming years.

David Boyd

Summary Statement of Financial Activities Year ended 31 March 2006

Incoming resources 2006 2006
£
2005
£
Generated funds    
Voluntary income *40,889 185,893
Activities for generating funds 9,687 3,609
Charitable activities    
Core grants 94,889 89,204
Programme activities 112,892 172,839
Total incoming resources 258,357 451,545
 
Resources expended    
Cost of generating voluntary income 8,102 8,082
Charitable activities *254,808 352,264
Governance costs 3,759 2,660
 
Total resources expended 266,669 363,006
 
Net outgoing (incoming) resources for year (8,312) 88,539
Funds brought forward 298,718 210,179
Total funds carried forward 290,406 298,718
* includes restricted funds income £12,077 and costs £14,626    
 
Balance Sheet 2006 2005
31 March 2006 £ £
Fixed assets 495,672 460,796
Current assets    
Debtors 23,194 30,235
Cash at bank and in hand 202 18
  23,396 30,253
Creditors falling due within one year (228,662) (192,331)
Net current liabilities (205,266) (162,078)
Net assets 290,406 298,718
 
Reserves    
Unrestricted funds- general funds (186,712) (180,949)
Restricted funds - building and capital grant 477,118 479,667
  290,406 298,718
 

The summary figures for 2006 and 2005 have been extracted from the full audited accounts.

Future Plans

As well as continuing our ongoing cross-community programmes with children and young people in 2007, we are looking forward to the development of special projects initiated in 2006 and several new initiatives:-

  • Extending the Children's Respite Project to include new groups of marginalised children.
  • Developing the New skills 4 All citizenship project for adults in Down District.
  • Upgrading facilities in the old house.
  • Developing a teenage programme with an emphasis on volunteering and citizenship.
  • Organising programmes with adults focusing on promoting positive community relations.
  • Extending our international projects to include study tours in Northern Ireland.
  • Including more groups from the ethnic and national minorities in our community.
  • Recruiting, and supporting more volunteers.
  • Marketing the various facilities at Glebe House to a wider potential clientele.
  • Increasing our service level agreements with Social Services Trusts and other agencies.
  • Continuing to build on our fundraising strategy and increase our income generation.


20 anniversary booklet 1985

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Harmony Community Trust, Glebe House, 23 Bishopscourt Road, Strangford, Co. Down, BT30 7NZ
Tel: 028 4488 1374          Email: info@glebehouseni.com
Registered Charity I.R. No. XN48510      Company Limited by Guarantee No. N.I. 10639